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The solubilization and morphological change of human platelets in various detergents



The solubilization and morphological change of human platelets in various detergents



Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 980(1): 56-68



The solubilization of human gel-filtered platelets by octyl glucoside, Triton X-100, dodecylsulfate, and deoxycholate was compared from the analysis of (1) cell lysis, (2) marker leakiness, and (3) component solubility. These analyses all revealed that the effect of detergent concentration on the solubilization of palatelets by these detergents was exerted in three stages, i.e., the prelytic, lytic, and complete platelet-lysis stages. These analyses also indicated several differences among platelets in these detergents. (i) The ratio of the platelet-saturation concentration (PSC) to critical micellar concentration (CMC) was about 1/2 for octyl glucoside, Triton X-100 and dodecylsulfate, while it was close to 1 for deoxycholate. (ii) Platelets in octyl glucoside, Triton X-100, and dodecylsulfate all showed parallel curves in cell lysis, protein solubilization and marker leakiness, while the platelet lysis in deoxycholate was identical to the phospholipid solublization. (iii) The solubility curves of various components in Triton X-100 and deoxycholate were parallel. However, the solubility of cholesterol in octyl glucoside was lower than that of protein and phospholipid. In dodecylsulfate, the solubility of phospholipid and cholesterol was very low in comparison with that of protein. In addition, morphological studies using scanning electron microscopy (scanning EM) revealed that the solubilization by octyl glucoside or Triton X-100 might occur via membrane area expansion. On the other hand, the solublization by dodecylsulfate or deoxycholate showed membrane vesiculation prior to cell lysis. Moreover, in the prelytic stage, the morphological change in platelets in ocytl glucoside showed only concentration dependence by swelling to an ellipsoid and then to a sphere. However, the morphological change in platelets in the other three detergents was dependent not only on the detergent concentration but also on prolonged incubation. Specifically, in Triton X-100, the cells initially changed to spiculate discs and then reached their final shape as swollen discs with surface invagination. In dodecylsulfate and deoxycholate the morphological changes were almost the same. The cell initially deformed in shape to a spiculate disc and finally to a stretched-out flat form. The results are discussed according to the bilayer couple hypothesis. Also, in the prelytic stage, these detergents caused inhibition of the response of platelets to collagen and ADP-fibrinogen.

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Accession: 007936177

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 2923900

DOI: 10.1016/0005-2736(89)90200-9



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