EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Adjusting for time trends when estimating the relationship between dietary intake obtained from a food frequency questionnaire and true average intake



Adjusting for time trends when estimating the relationship between dietary intake obtained from a food frequency questionnaire and true average intake



Biometrics 51(1): 169-181



In measuring food intake, three common methods are used: 24-hour recalls, food frequency questionnaires and food records. Food records or 24-hour recalls are often thought to be the most reliable, but they are difficult and expensive to obtain. The question of interest to us is to use the food records or 24-hour recalls to examine possible systematic biases in questionnaires as a measure of usual food intake. In Freedman, et al. (1991), this problem is addressed through a linear errors in variables analysis. Their model assumes that all measurements on a given individual have the same mean and variance. However, such assumptions may be violated in at least two circumstances, as in for example the Women's Health Trial Vanguard Study and in the Finnish Smokers' Study. First, some studies occur over a period of years, and diets may change over the course of the study. Second, measurements might be taken at different times of the year, and it is known that diets differ on the basis of seasonal factors. In this paper, we will suggest new models incorporating mean and variance offsets, i.e., changes in the population mean and variance for observations taken at different time points. The parameters in the model are estimated by simple methods, and the theory of unbiased estimating equations (M-estimates) is used to derive asymptotic covariance matrix estimates. The methods are illustrated with data from the Women's Health Trial Vanguard Study.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 008112769

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 7766772

DOI: 10.2307/2533323



Related references

Estimating the relation between dietary intake obtained from a food frequency questionnaire and true average intake. American Journal of Epidemiology 134(3): 310-320, 1991

Relative validity of food frequency questionnaire for estimating dietary nutrients intake. Wei Sheng Yan Jiu 45(5): 743-748, 2018

Estimating dietary calcium intake with a short simplified food frequency questionnaire. FASEB Journal 4(4): A1058, 1990

Evaluation of a food frequency questionnaire-food composition approach for estimating dietary intake of inorganic arsenic and methylmercury. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention 6(12): 1043-1050, 1998

A food frequency questionnaire validated for estimating dietary flavonoid intake in an Australian population. Nutrition and Cancer 66(7): 1200-1210, 2015

Relative validity of food frequency questionnaire for estimating dietary iron intake of students with anemia. Wei Sheng Yan Jiu 40(5): 596-600, 2013

Reproducibility and validity of the food frequency questionnaire for estimating habitual dietary intake in children and adolescents. Nutrition Journal 10(): 27-27, 2011

The relative validity of a computerized food frequency questionnaire for estimating intake of dietary iron and its absorption modifiers. European journal of clinical nutrition 54(7): 592-599, 2000

Validity of a Self-Administered Food-Frequency Questionnaire for Assessing Amino Acid Intake in Japan: Comparison With Intake From 4-Day Weighed Dietary Records and Plasma Levels. Journal of Epidemiology 26(1): 36-44, 2016

Applicating food frequency questionnaire to assess the relationship between dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and hypertension, dyslipidemia of Pumi nationality. Wei Sheng Yan Jiu 42(4): 576-580, 2014

Food intake characteristics of hemodialysis patients as obtained by food frequency questionnaire. Journal of Renal Nutrition 12(1): 17-31, 2002

Recent alcohol intake as estimated by the Health Habits and History Questionnaire, the Harvard Semiquantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire, and a more detailed alcohol intake questionnaire. American Journal of Epidemiology 150(4): 334-340, 1999

A new method for estimating food and nutrient intake from qualitative food frequency questionnaire data. Working Paper Business School, University of Hertfordshire ( 10): vi + 15 pp., 1997

Food frequency questionnaire based on food groups for estimating individual nutrient intake. Japanese Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics 61(3): 161-169, 2003

Validation of a food frequency questionnaire based on food groups for estimating individual nutrient intake. Japanese Journal of Nutrition 59(5): 221-232, 2001