+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Alternative crops for duplex soils: Growth and water use of some cereal, legume, and oilseed crops, and pastures



Alternative crops for duplex soils: Growth and water use of some cereal, legume, and oilseed crops, and pastures



Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 49(1): 21-32



Lupin is the major break crop used by farmers in Western Australia but neither lupin nor wheat uses much water from the B horizon of the widespread duplex soils. This study investigated the productivity and water use of a range of crops and pastures during 2 seasons on a shallow duplex soil, with a sandy layer 30-40 cm deep, at East Beverley, WA. The aims of the work were to evaluate the crops as alternative break crops to lupin on these soils, and to establish whether roots could proliferate in the clay layer, promoting both water extraction from the subsoil by that crop and improving yields of subsequent wheat crops. During the winter of the first season, a perched watertable developed for almost 3 months and some crops (especially lentil) grew poorly. Yields in the second season were generally good (lupin was close to the calculated potential yield and canola and Indian mustard were >2 t/ha), establishing that successful crops of oilseeds and grain legumes can be grown on this soil provided that there is adequate water without topsoil waterlogging. Yields of subsequent wheat crops were largest when following legume crops (40% in one season and 135% in the second compared with wheat following wheat or barley) but were also significantly greater following oilseeds (22% and 102%). Roots of cereals and pastures reached 80 cm in both seasons, whereas those of the oilseeds reached 60-80 cm depending on crop and season. Rooting depth of legumes varied from 70-80 cm for field pea to 30-50 cm for chickpea and faba bean, with lupin extending to 60 cm in both seasons. As with shoot mass, root mass differed between seasons, although on average, in mid September cereals and oilseeds had a smaller proportion (0.12 and 0.14) of total mass below ground than the legumes (0.24) and pasture species (0.18). Only a few millimeters of water was extracted from the subsoil by any crop in either season and there was no evidence that tap-rooted legumes or oilseeds were better able than other crops either to exploit subsoil water for their own use or to create pores that subsequent wheat crops might exploit.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 008132687

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

Diseases diagnosed on vegetable crops, greenhouse crops, herbaceous and wood ornamentals, fruit crops, turfgrass, cereal crops, forage crops, and oilseed and special field crops from Alberta submitted to Brooks Diagnostics Limited in 1995. Canadian Plant Disease Survey 76(1): 42-50, 1996

Limitations to growth and yield of cereal and lupin crops on duplex soils. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture 32(7): 929-945, 1992

The N:P stoichiometry of cereal, grain legume and oilseed crops. Field Crops Research 95(1): 13-29, 2006

The phenology of eight cereal, grain legume, and oilseed crops in South Australia. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture and Animal Husbandry 22(114/115): 67-75, 1982

The phenology of 8 cereal grain legume and oilseed crops in south australia. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture & Animal Husbandry 22(114-115): 67-75, 1982

Tolerance of some winter cereal, legume and oilseed crops to pre-sowing applications of dicamba. Proceedings of the Sixth Australian Weeds Conference, 1981 (Volume 1): 127-131, 1981

Nitrogen availability in a Darling Downs soil following cereal, oilseed and grain legume crops. 2. Effects of residual soil nitrogen and fertiliser nitrogen on subsequent wheat crops. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture 26(3): 353-359, 1986

Nitrogen availability in a darling downs queensland australia soil following cereal oilseed and grain legume crops 2. effects of residual soil nitrogen and fertilizer nitrogen on subsequent wheat crops. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture 26(3): 353-360, 1986

Comparison of winter cereal, oilseed and grain legume crops on the Darling Downs, Queensland. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture 26(3): 339-346, 1986

Productivity and economic effectiveness of cereal and cereal -legume crops on soddy-podzolic, sandy loam soils. Sbornik nauchnykh trudov: 7 7-10, 1973

Response of legume and oilseed crops to different sources of sulfur and magnesium in some alluvial soils. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science 31(1): 60-64, 1983

The phenology of eight cereal, grain legume, and oilseed crops in South Australia Wheat, barley, oats, lupins, peas, rape, linseed, safflower. Australian journal of experimental agriculture and animal husbandry 22(114-115): 67-75, 1982

Copper deficiency in cereal and oilseed crops in northern canadian prairie soils. Agronomy Journal 78(2): 317-323, 1986

Influence of some leguminous crops and legume-and-cereal mixtures on the yields of subsequent crops. Rostl. Vyroba, 15: XLII, 105-116, 1969

Pastures and forage crops: what are the consequences for birds in environments with intensive cereal crops?. Fourrages (178): 171-178, 2004