+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Content and bioavailability of iron from vegetarian and omnivorous diets



Content and bioavailability of iron from vegetarian and omnivorous diets



Journal of the Chinese Agricultural Chemical Society 32(3): 284-293



The iron content in vegetarian and omnivorous diets was quantified by both chemical analysis and by calculation from food composition tables. The bioavailability of iron from these diets was estimated on a meal basis of the amount of heme iron, non-heme iron and enhancing factors including ascorbic acid, meat, fish and poultry. Foods from vegetarian and omnivorous diets were collected from the student dining service in Yuan-Guan Buddhist College, Chungli, and the National Defense Medical School, Taipei, respectively. Three servings of every dish provided at breakfast, lunch and dinner were collected, weighed, combined, freeze-dried, ground up, and used for chemical analysis. By calculation, the iron supply averaged 19.8 mg/day and 17.5 mg/day, and the iron density was 7.7 and 7.5 mg/1000 kcal, in omnivorous and vegetarian diets, respectively. By chemical analysis, the iron supply was 16.1 and 11.6 mg/day, and the iron density was 6.2 and 5.0 mg/1000 kcal in omnivorous and vegetarian diets, respectively. Non-heme iron was the major dietary iron form. Correlation between calculated and analyzed values was significant for both types of diets, but in the vegetarian diets, the analyzed value was significantly less than the calculated value. Estimated amount of bioavailable iron was 0.65 mg/1000 kcal from the omnivorous diets, and it was 0.39 and 0.22 mg/day in the vegetarian diets with or without the vitamin C effect, respectively. The estimated bioavailability was 8.4% in the omnivorous diet, and it was 5.3% and 3.0% in the vegetarian diets with and without the vitamin C effect, respectively. The vegetarian diets were low in both iron content and availability, and may not provide adequate iron for women of child-bearing age.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 008380649

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

Dietary iron bioavailability affects fecal ferritin content in women consuming vegetarian and non-vegetarian diets. FASEB Journal 11(3): A443, 1997

Selenium content of omnivorous and vegetarian diets. Federation Proceedings 35(3): 360, 1976

Selenium content of omnivorous and vegetarian diets. Indian journal of nutrition and dietetics 17(2): 53-59, 1980

Iron and zinc status of female adolescents consuming vegetarian and omnivorous diets. FASEB Journal 7(3-4): A412, 1993

Iron and zinc status of young women aged 14 to 19 years consuming vegetarian and omnivorous diets. Journal of the American College of Nutrition 14(5): 463-472, 1995

Dietary intakes of adolescent females consuming vegetarian, semi-vegetarian, and omnivorous diets. Journal of Adolescent Health 18(4): 292-300, 1996

Bioavailability of iron, zinc, and other trace minerals from vegetarian diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 78(3 Suppl.): 633s-639s, 2003

Content and bioavailability of trace elements in vegetarian diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 59(5 Suppl.): 1223s-1232s, 1994

Comparison of vegetarian diets and omnivorous diets on plasma level of HDL-c: a meta-analysis. Plos one 9(3): E92609, 2014

ACP Journal Club. Review: vegetarian diets reduce systolic and diastolic blood pressure more than omnivorous diets. Annals of Internal Medicine 160(12): Jc3-Jc3, 2014

Zn, Cu and Mg contents in omnivorous and vegetarian diets. Journal of the Chinese Agricultural Chemical Society 33(3): 273-279, 1995

Mineral bioavailability in vegetarian and omnivorous meals served in a university restaurant. Revista de Nutricao 20(3): 229-237, 2007

The Effect of Omnivorous and Vegetarian Diets on Reproduction in the Albino Rat. Science 47(1209): 223-224, 1918

Growth and longevity of rats fed omnivorous and vegetarian diets. Journal of Nutrition 34(1): 81-96, 1947

Life span of rats on vegetarian and omnivorous diets. Chinese Jour Physiol 16(2): 229-239, 1941