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Detection of human papillomavirus DNA by in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction in human papillomavirus equivocal and dysplastic cervical biopsies



Detection of human papillomavirus DNA by in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction in human papillomavirus equivocal and dysplastic cervical biopsies



Human Pathology 24(9): 1012-1016



One hundred twenty-one paraffin-embedded cervical biopsy specimens were tested for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. By in situ hybridization using probes for HPV types 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/ 35, 42/43/44, 51/52, and 45/56, HPV DNA was found in none of 20 normal/squamous metaplasia biopsy specimens, in one of 76 HPV equivocal biopsy specimens, in seven of 12 condyloma/mild dysplasia biopsy specimens, and in 12 of 13 moderate/severe dysplasia biopsy specimens. Polymerase chain reaction using HPV L1 consensus sequence primers followed by filter hybridization of the amplification products was positive for HPV DNA in two of 20 normal/squamous metaplasia biopsy specimens, in 23 of 76 HPV equivocal biopsy specimens, in eight of 12 condyloma/mild dysplasia biopsy specimens, and in 12 of 13 moderate/severe dysplasia biopsy specimens. Among biopsies that tested positive by polymerase chain reaction but that were negative by in situ hybridization, the most commonly identified HPV was type 16. We conclude that although HPV equivocal biopsy specimens contain HPV DNA more frequently than histologically normal tissue, the majority of biopsy specimens in this category test negative for HPV DNA. The clinical significance of a positive test for HPV, in the absence of unequivocal histologic changes, remains to be determined.

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Accession: 008440178

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 8253456

DOI: 10.1016/0046-8177(93)90117-y


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