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Effect of intrauterine growth retardation on postnatal weight change in preterm infants



Effect of intrauterine growth retardation on postnatal weight change in preterm infants



Journal Of Pediatrics. 123(2): 301-306



To investigate the cause or causes of early postnatal weight change, we measured total body water and fluid and energy balances in 14 preterm infants who were appropriate in size for gestational age (AGA) and in 5 weight-matched, preterm, small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants. On the first day of life, AGA and SGA infants had the same weight and total body water content. At 6 +- 2 days (mean +- SD), AGA infants had had significant weight loss (94 +- 45 gm) and body water loss (67 +- 80 ml), whereas weight and total body water content in the SGA infants at the same age (5 +- 1 days) did not differ from the values at birth. Loss of weight and total body water in AGA infants was accompanied by a greater diuresis than in SGA infants at the same amount of fluid intake. At the end of week 1, AGA and SGA infants had the some total energy expenditure (184 +- 33 vs 171 +- 17 kJ cntdot kg-1 cntdot day-1); energy intake, which had exceeded total energy expenditure from the third day of life and beyond, already provided 188 +- 46 (AGA) or 209 +- 109 kJ cntdot kg-1 cntdot day-1 (SGA), respectively, for energy storage. Nitrogen balance was positive. Subsequent weight gain occurred at the some rate in AGA and SGA infants; both total body water and solids increased. Energy intake, total energy expenditure, and the amount of energy stored (measured during stable weight gain on a regimen of full enteral feedings) had significantly increased compared with week 1, but both groups maintained similar energy storage. We conclude that the initial weight loss in infants is caused by a contraction of body water that does not occur in SGA infants; both groups have a subsequent weight gain at the same rate, with similar proportional increase in total body water and solids.

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Accession: 008536240

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 8345431

DOI: 10.1016/s0022-3476(05)81707-x


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