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Evaluation of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine impregnated central venous catheters for the prevention of bloodstream infection in leukaemic patients: a randomized controlled trial



Evaluation of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine impregnated central venous catheters for the prevention of bloodstream infection in leukaemic patients: a randomized controlled trial



Journal of Hospital Infection 37(2): 145-156



It has been suggested that central venous catheters impregnated with antiseptics such as chlohexidine and silver-sulfadiazine reduce the risk of catheter-related bacteraemia in intensive care patients. Patients suffering from haematologic malignancy treated by chemotherapy through a central venous catheter are at even greater risk of catheter-related bacteraemia. A prospective double-blind randomized controlled trial was performed in order to investigate the effectiveness of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine impregnated catheters (CH-SS) in these patients. A total of 680 catheters (13 826 catheter days) were inserted, of which 338 were antiseptic impregnated. Bloodstream infection was observed in 105 cases with an overall risk of 7.6 per 1000 catheter days. Thirty-two infections (30.5%) were catheter-related, corresponding to a risk of 2.3 per 1000 catheter days. There was no statistically significant difference between the overall rates of bloodstream infection for impregnated and non-impregnated catheters (14.5 vs. 16.3%). The incidence of catheter-related infection was also similar in both groups (5 vs. 4.4%) and there was no difference in the time of the onset of bacteraemia in the two groups. It is concluded that the use of CH-SS catheters in patients with haematologic malignancy reduces neither the overall risk of bloodstream infection, nor the catheter-related infection rate, nor the delay for the occurrence of infection.

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Accession: 008633192

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 9364263

DOI: 10.1016/s0195-6701(97)90184-5


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