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Evaluation of commercially-used collectors for Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea commercialis and Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas



Evaluation of commercially-used collectors for Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea commercialis and Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas



Aquacultural Engineering. 12(2): 63-79



Ten types of commercially-used collectors were evaluated for natural settlement and retention of juvenile Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea commercialis) and barnacles (Balanus spp.), over 271 days in Port Stephens, NSW, Australia. Juvenile Sydney rock oysters (spat) from six collector types were then removed and on-grown in timber and PVC mesh trays for 14 days, to assess whether collector type affected post-harvest survival. Retention and growth of Sydney rock oysters to market size were also assessed 843 days after deployment, on five types of collectors used for on-growing. Nine of the collector types were also evaluated as substrates for settlement of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) in Port Stephens. Density at settlement and retention of juvenile and adult oysters was higher on PVC collectors than on traditionally-used tarred sticks. Density of Sydney rock oyster spat, was higher (P lt 0.05) on five types of PVC collectors, and the bioresin slats than on tarred sticks. Retention of spat on four types of PVC collectors was also higher (P lt 0.05) than on tarred sticks between 172 and 271 days. There was a significant relationship (P lt 0.001) between oyster density at day 172 and spat losses at day 271. More barnicles settled on tarred sticks than on other substances (P lt 0.05). Post-harvest survival of single Sydney rock oyster spat 14 days after removal from collectors was high (89-94%) and similar (p gt 0.05) for four types of PVC collectors and tarred sticks (P lt 0.05). However, survival of spat removed from bioresin slats was lower (66.8%). At harvest (day 843), the highest (P lt 0.05) number of market size Sydney rock oysters were retained on four types of PVC sticks and the lowest number on tarred sticks. With the exception of flat spiky 4 degree C sticks, which had a higher percentage loss than round spiky PVC sticks (p lt 0.01), oyster losses between day 172 and harvest for all five types of on-growing collectors were uniformly high (range 92.6-96.5%; P gt 0.05), despite the differences in initial spat density. Spat density of Pacific oysters was higher (P lt 0.001) on three types of PVC collectors than on tarred sticks, PVC slats and bioresin slats.

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Accession: 008633340

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DOI: 10.1016/0144-8609(93)90017-6



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