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Food neophobia in humans: effects of manipulated arousal and individual differences in sensation seeking



Food neophobia in humans: effects of manipulated arousal and individual differences in sensation seeking



Physiology and Behavior 61(2): 331-335



The study examined the effects of manipulated arousal and the trait of Sensation Seeking on willingness to taste novel foods (as assessed by means of a choice task). Arousal was manipulated by having subjects play an exciting, neutral, or boring video game. In line with predictions from optimal level of arousal theories, subjects chose more novel foods when manipulated arousal was low (vs. neutral) and fewer novel foods when manipulated arousal was high (vs. neutral). There was no main effect of individual differences in optimal level of arousal as assessed by the Sensation Seeking Scale; however, an interaction between the two independent variables revealed high-sensation seekers to try more novel foods than lows under conditions of low arousal.

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Accession: 008697658

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 9035266

DOI: 10.1016/s0031-9384(96)00406-4


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