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High throughput fluorescence-based conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (F-CSGE) identifies six unique BRCA2 mutations and an overall low incidence of BRCA2 mutations in high-risk BRCA1-negative breast cancer families



High throughput fluorescence-based conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (F-CSGE) identifies six unique BRCA2 mutations and an overall low incidence of BRCA2 mutations in high-risk BRCA1-negative breast cancer families



Human Genetics 102(5): 549-556



Mutational analysis of cancer susceptibility genes has opened up a new era in clinical genetics. In this report we present the results of mutational analysis of the BRCA2 coding sequences in 105 high-risk individuals affected with breast cancer and/or ovarian cancer and previously found to be negative for mutations of the BRCA1 coding sequence in our laboratory. These individuals have a positive family history with three or more cases of breast cancer and/or ovarian cancer at any age from the same side of the family tree. In order to perform a high throughput and reliable mutational analysis of the BRCA genes, we have adapted the conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation-scanning assay to a fluorescent platform. The advantages are speed, reproducibility and enhanced resolving power of the scanning method. Four unique mutations, including one missense and three frameshift mutations, were identified in the pool of 60 non-Jewish patients (7%). Two cases of the 6174delT mutation were identified in the 45 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals studied (5%). In addition, two novel frameshift mutations, not characteristic of the Jewish subgroup, were identified. Thus there were four mutations in total in this ethnic subgroup (9%). The six mutations identified in this combined patient pool, excluding the 6174delT mutations, are novel and have not been previously reported in the Breast Cancer Information Core (BIC) database. The results indicate that BRCA2 mutations account for the disease in less than 10% of this patient population. In addition, there is no significant difference in frequency of BRCA2 mutations between the Ashkenazi Jewish and non-Jewish families in our clinical patient pool.

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Accession: 008773195

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 9654203

DOI: 10.1007/s004390050738


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