+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Iron supplementation in pregnancy: is less enough? A randomized, placebo controlled trial of low dose iron supplementation with and without heme iron



Iron supplementation in pregnancy: is less enough? A randomized, placebo controlled trial of low dose iron supplementation with and without heme iron



Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 76(9): 822-828



Background. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of low dose iron supplementation with and without a heme component, prescribed for women in the second half of pregnancy. Method. A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. Thirty-one women received a daily dose of 27 mg elemental iron in a product containing both heme iron and non-heme iron (Hemofer), 30 women received the same dose as pure non-heme iron with vitamin C (Collets jern med vitamin C), and 29 women received placebo. A double dummy technique was used to mask tablets. The women were tested for red cell indices and iron status markers (s-ferritin, s-iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity and erythrocyte protoporphyrin) throughout pregnancy and 8 and 24 weeks postpartum. The results were analyzed according to the 'intention to treat' principle. Results. The hematological effects were equal in the two treatment groups. 25% of the supplemented women fell below 110 g/l in Hb vs 52% in the placebo group (p lt 0.05); none fell below 100 g/l in the supplemented groups, 14% in the placebo group. Iron status was significantly better for all measured parameters in the heme iron group compared to placebo at the end of pregnancy. Differences between the other groups were only shown for some parameters, probably due to the small sample size. In the heme iron group there were fewer women with empty iron stores postpartum than at the start of pregnancy (from 14% to 8%), in the non-heme iron group there was a significant increase (from 3% to 27%), and in the placebo group the percentage of women with empty iron stores was more than doubled (from 21% to 52%). Conclusions. A daily dose of 27 mg elemental iron, containing a heme component, given in the second half of pregnancy, prevents depletion of iron stores after birth in most women. An equivalent dose of pure inorganic iron seems less effective, but the sample size in this study was too small to demonstrate significant differences between the two treatment groups.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 008918584

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 9351406

DOI: 10.3109/00016349709024359


Related references

Iron Supplementation in Twin Pregnancy - The Benefit of Doubling the Iron Dose in Iron Deficient Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Twin Research and Human Genetics 20(5): 419-424, 2017

Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of iron supplementation in infants with low hemoglobin levels fed iron-fortified formula. Pediatrics 88(2): 320-326, 1991

A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial of education and iron supplementation for mitigation of iron deficiency in regular blood donors. Transfusion 56(6 Pt 2): 1588-1597, 2016

Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of iron supplementation in female soldiers during military training: effects on iron status, physical performance, and mood. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 90(1): 124-131, 2009

Effect of directly observed oral iron supplementation during pregnancy on iron status in a rural population in Haryana: A randomized controlled trial. Indian Journal of Public Health 62(4): 287-293, 2018

A randomized controlled trial of oral heme iron polypeptide versus oral iron supplementation for the treatment of anaemia in peritoneal dialysis patients: HEMATOCRIT trial. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 27(11): 4146-4153, 2012

A Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial to Determine the Effect of Iron Supplementation on Pregnancy Outcome in Pregnant Women With Hemoglobin >13.2 g/dL. Obstetric and Gynecologic Survey 62(9): 574-576, 2007

Multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy does not lead to greater infant birth size than does iron-only supplementation: a randomized controlled trial in a semirural community in Mexico. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 77(3): 720-725, 2003

Effect of postpartum iron supplementation on red cell and iron parameters in non-anaemic iron-deficient women: a randomised placebo-controlled study. Bjog 112(4): 445-450, 2005

Daily iron supplementation is more effective than twice weekly iron supplementation in pregnant women in Pakistan in a randomized double-blind clinical trial. Journal of Nutrition 130(11): 2697-2702, 2000

Prevention of iron-deficiency anaemia during pregnancy by early iron supplementation: a controlled trial. Revue d' Epidemiologie et de Sante Publique 37(2): 109-118, 1989

Prevention of iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy using early iron supplementation: a controlled trial. Revue d'Epidemiologie et de Sante Publique 37(2): 109-118, 1989

Effects of vitamin A supplementation on iron status indices and iron deficiency anaemia: a randomized controlled trial. Nutrients 6(1): 190-206, 2013

Effect of iron supplementation during lactation on maternal iron status and oxidative stress: A randomized controlled trial. Maternal and Child Nutrition 13(4):, 2017

Serum erythropoietin during normal pregnancy: relationship to hemoglobin and iron status markers and impact of iron supplementation in a longitudinal, placebo-controlled study on 118 women. International Journal of Hematology 66(2): 159-168, 1997