EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Race differences in estimates of sudden coronary heart disease mortality, 1980-1988: The impact of ill-defined death



Race differences in estimates of sudden coronary heart disease mortality, 1980-1988: The impact of ill-defined death



Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 49(11): 1247-1251



Coronary heart disease (CHD) deaths occurring outside of hospitals or in emergency rooms (OH/ER) have been used to estimate sudden CHD mortality. This study quantifies the potential impact of natural deaths coded to an unspecified cause on race differences in sudden CHD estimates, during 1980-1988. Death certificate data for OH/ER deaths in 40 U.S. states were used to create annual age-adjusted rates for sudden CHD and sudden CHD rates revised to include deaths with an unspecified cause (ICD9, 780-799). Revising the mortality rates to include unspecified deaths results in greater racial disparities for estimates of sudden CHD. In 1980, black-white race differences went from 89 to 128 and 103 to 121 (per 100,000) for men and women, respectively, with revision. Among blacks, revised sudden CHD mortality declined approximately 22%, during 1980-1988, compared to 10% for unrevised sudden CHD; with no observed effect of revision on percent declines among whites. Previous studies may have underestimated declines in racial disparities of sudden CHD, due to improved quality of OH/ER death certification among blacks. Improved access to routine and emergency medical care, through increased affordability and greater availability, may be important to address higher OH/ER CHD among blacks.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 009291362

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 8892492

DOI: 10.1016/s0895-4356(96)00217-x



Related references

Community surveillance for coronary heart disease mortality death certificates in the study of sudden cardiac death. American Journal of Epidemiology 104(3): 337, 1976

Sudden death and the decline in coronary heart disease mortality. Journal of Chronic Diseases 39(12): 1001-1019, 1986

Sex differences in coronary heart disease mortality trends: the Minnesota Heart Survey, 1970-1988. Epidemiology 4(1): 79-82, 1993

Sudden cardiac death and prehospital mortality in coronary heart disease. Kardiologia Polska 70(12): 1235-1236, 2013

Temporal trends in coronary heart disease mortality and sudden cardiac death from 1950 to 1999: the Framingham Heart Study. Circulation 110(5): 522-527, 2004

Coronary heart disease mortality and sudden death among the 35-44-year age group in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Annals of Epidemiology 6(2): 130-136, 1996

Fall in coronary heart disease mortality in U.S.A. and Australia due to sudden death: evidence for the role of polyunsaturated fat. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 42(9): 885-893, 1989

Cohort Profile: The Cohort of Universities of Minas Gerais (CUME). International Journal of Epidemiology: -, 2018

Review: n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce fatal MI, sudden death, and overall mortality in coronary heart disease. Acp Journal Club 137(2): 49-49, 2002

Sudden death in the Framingham Heart Study. Differences in incidence and risk factors by sex and coronary disease status. American Journal of Epidemiology 120(6): 888-899, 1984

Coronary heart disease mortality and sudden death: trends and patterns in 35- to 44-year-old white males, 1970-1990. American Journal of Epidemiology 142(1): 45-52, 1995

Can heart rate variability predict sudden death? A case of sudden death in a child with severe coronary sequelae of Kawasaki disease. Pediatric Cardiology 21(4): 403-406, 2000

Out-of-hospital sudden coronary death: separate acute coronary syndrome or the mode of death due to ischemic (coronary) heart disease?. Kardiologiia 43(7): 41-48, 2003