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Radial maze performance and open-field behaviours in aged C57BL/6 mice: Further evidence for preserved cognitive abilities during senescence



Radial maze performance and open-field behaviours in aged C57BL/6 mice: Further evidence for preserved cognitive abilities during senescence



Physiology and Behavior 55(2): 341-345



C57BL/6 mice, aged 2 or 24 months, were tested in a radial maze and observed for an 8-min period, repeated on 3 consecutive days, in an open-field situation with a novel object. In the eight-arm maze, the number of unrepeated path choices made by old mice does not significantly increase with training, whereas it does in young mice. Older animals also take significantly longer to solve the task but the two age groups do not differ with respect to how many paths they run before making the first error or in the strategies used to solve the task. In the open-field situation, the two age groups differ with regard to grooming and rearing behaviour, while in the novelty situation, older animal show a higher level of locomotor activity, perform less freezing, and interact more with the novel object. Habituation curves for all parameters, except grooming in the open field, do not differ between the two groups, thus indicating that this form of nonassociative learning does not vary substantially with increasing age. Results are discussed in terms of preserved cognitive abilities during senescence in that strain.

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Accession: 009291699

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 8153176

DOI: 10.1016/0031-9384(94)90144-9



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