+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

The prognostic significance of race and survival from prostate cancer based on patients irradiated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocols (1976-1985)



The prognostic significance of race and survival from prostate cancer based on patients irradiated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocols (1976-1985)



International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics 24(3): 441-449



A number of studies have identified race as a prognostic factor for survival from prostate cancer. To evaluate the prognostic significance of race in a controlled setting, we evaluated 1294 patients treated on three prospective randomized trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group between 1976 to 1985. One-hundred and twenty (9%) of the patients were coded as black, while 1077 (83%) of the patients were coded as white. Protocol 7506 included 607 patients with clinical Stage T-3-T-4N-x or T-1b-T-2N-1-2. Protocol 7706 included 484 patients with clinical Stage T-1b or T-2 who were node negative. Protocol 8307 included 203 Stage T-2b-T-4 patients with no lymph node involvement beyond the pelvis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the possible independent significance of race and other prognostic factors, including Gleason score, serum acid phosphatase, nodal status, and hormonal status. Protocols 7706 and 8307 revealed that race was not of prognostic significance for disease-free or overall survival by either univariate or multivariate analysis. Univariate analysis of Protocol 7506 revealed that the median survival for blacks was somewhat shorter (5.4 years vs. 7.1 years, p = 0.02). This difference persisted after a multivariate analysis. A higher percentage of blacks treated on 7506 had an abnormally elevated serum acid phosphatase compared to whites (p = 0.006), and the time to distant failure tended to be shorter (p = 0.07). These findings suggest that blacks treated on 7506 may have had more extensive disease at presentation. Based on these prospective randomized trials, it is most likely that the lower survival noted for black Americans with prostate cancer reflects the tendency for blacks to present with more advanced disease. Differences in access to care, the quality of care received, and the impact of co-morbid conditions may explain the lower survival reported for black Americans elsewhere in the literature.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 009611203

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 1399729

DOI: 10.1016/0360-3016(92)91058-u


Related references

Race and survival of men treated for prostate cancer on radiation therapy oncology group phase III randomized trials. Journal of Urology 169(1): 245-250, 2002

Race and Survival of Men Treated for Prostate Cancer on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase Iii Randomized Trials. The Journal of Urology 169(1): 245-250, 2003

Mitotic figures as a prognostic marker in prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy A radiation therapy oncology group study. Laboratory Investigation 81(1): 112A, 2001

Race is not an independent predictor of disease specific long term survival among men treated for prostate cancer on radiation therapy oncology group trials. Journal of Urology 163(4 Suppl ): 55, 2000

Long term survival in 1500 men treated for prostate cancer with radiotherapy aloneg Radiation therapy oncology group protocols 7706, 7506, 8531 and 8610. Journal of Urology 159(5 SUPPL ): 219, 1998

Loss of p16 expression is of prognostic significance in locally advanced prostate cancer: an analysis from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 86-10. Journal of Clinical Oncology 21(17): 3328-3334, 2003

Four prognostic groups predict long-term survival from prostate cancer following radiotherapy alone on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials. International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics 47(3): 609-615, June 1, 2000

Prognostic value of p16 in locally advanced prostate cancer: a study based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 9202. Journal of Clinical Oncology 25(21): 3082-3089, 2007

Impact of marital status and race on outcomes of patients enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group prostate cancer trials. Supportive Care in Cancer 20(6): 1317-1325, 2012

The influence of gender, race, and marital status on survival in lung cancer patients: analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trials. Journal of Thoracic Oncology 5(5): 631-639, 2010

Comparative quality-adjusted survival analysis between radiation therapy alone and radiation with androgen deprivation therapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer: a secondary analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31 with novel decision analysis methods. Prostate International 6(4): 140-144, 2018

Impact of gender, partner status, and race on locoregional failure and overall survival in head and neck cancer patients in three radiation therapy oncology group trials. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics 81(3): E101-E109, 2011

Effect of obesity on prostate-specific antigen recurrence after radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer as measured by the 2006 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-American Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology (RTOG-ASTRO) Phoenix consensus definition. Cancer 110(5): 1003-1009, 2007

Survival advantage from higher-dose radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer treated on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trials. Journal of Clinical Oncology 18(14): 2740-2746, 2000

A randomized phase I/II trial of hyperfractionated radiation therapy with total doses of 60.0 Gy to 79.2 Gy: possible survival benefit with greater than or equal to 69.6 Gy in favorable patients with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group stage III non-small-cell lung carcinoma: report of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 83-11. Journal of Clinical Oncology 8(9): 1543-1555, 1990