+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Thermodynamics of methanogenic intermediary metabolism in littoral sediment of Lake Constance



Thermodynamics of methanogenic intermediary metabolism in littoral sediment of Lake Constance



FEMS (Federation of European Microbiological Societies) Microbiology Ecology 12(4): 265-276



In anoxic methanogenic sediments organic matter is degraded to CH-4 and CO-2 via intermediary metabolites. When CH-4 production in slurries of littoral sediments was inhibited by chloroform, acetate accumulated with a rate (2.26 mu-M h-1) similar to the turnover rate (2.09 mu-M h-1) of (2-14C)acetate. Addition of chloroform resulted also in accumulation of propionate gt 2-propanol gt caproate gt valerate gt H-2. Accumulation of H-2 was small but sufficient to thermodynamically inhibit consumption of caproate and valerate by H+-reducing bacteria. Consumption stopped when the available Gibbs free energy had increased from about -16 to about -9 kJ mol-1 H-2 produced. 2-Propanol increased probably mainly because of the accumulation of acetate with the available DELTA-G increasing from about -13 to -3 kJ mol-1 of 2-propanol consumed. Propionate accumulation, however, could not be explained by thermodynamic inhibition of propionate consumption since the Gibbs free energy of this reaction was generally very low (DELTA-G apprxeq -3 kJ mol-1). Bacterial enrichment cultures on cellulose resulted in the production of similar metabolites as observed during the accumulation experiments. Assuming that propionate, 2-propanol, caproate and valerate were converted via acetate and H-2 and CH-4, their accumulation rates plus that of acetate accounted for 134% of the rate of CH-4 production. Carbon flow through acetate accounted for 80-87% of the total carbon flow to CH-4. This relatively high percentage may be due to the relative importance of either homoacetogenesis or of acetate-rich organic matter (e.g., chitin) in littoral sediment of Lake Constance.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 009641772

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6941.1993.tb00039.x


Related references

Methane production in littoral sediment of Lake Constance. Fems (federation Of European Microbiological Societies) Microbiology Ecology. 102(3-4): 279-289, 1993

Microbial sulfate reduction in littoral sediment of lake constance. FEMS Microbiology Ecology 85(1): 31-42, 1991

Sulfate reducing bacteria in littoral sediment of lake constance. FEMS Microbiology Ecology 85(1): 43-52, 1991

Sulfate-reducing bacteria in littoral sediment of Lake Constance. Fems Microbiology Ecology 8(1): 43-52, 1991

Dominant sugar utilizers in sediment of Lake Constance depend on syntrophic cooperation with methanogenic partner organisms. Environmental Microbiology 10(6): 1501-1511, 2008

Methylosoma difficile gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel methanotroph enriched by gradient cultivation from littoral sediment of Lake Constance. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 57(Pt 5): 1073-1080, 2007

The Active Sulfate-Reducing Microbial Community in Littoral Sediment of Oligotrophic Lake Constance. Frontiers in Microbiology 10: 247, 2019

Spatial patterns of surface sediment variables in the littoral zone of Lake Constance (Germany). Archiv fuer Hydrobiologie 161(4): 455-468, 2004

Population description of the non-methanogenic phase of anaerobic digestionIV. Intermediary metabolism of non-methanogenic bacteria. Water Research 4(4): 315-326, 1970

Spatial models as a tool to identify spatial patterns of surficial sediment composition and their contributing factors in the littoral zone of Lake Constance (Germany). Aquatic Sciences 67(3): 326-336, 2005

Littoral zone-GIS of Lake Constance: A useful tool in lake monitoring and autoecological studies with submersed macrophytes. Aquatic Botany 58(3-4): 333-346, 1997

Littoral zone-GIS of Lake Constance: a useful tool in lake monitoring and autecological studies with submersed macrophytes. Aquatic Botany 58(3/4): 333-346, 1997

Spatial distribution of littoral fish species in a large European lake, Lake Constance, Germany. Archiv fuer Hydrobiologie 140(1): 91-116, 1997

Metabolism of position labelled glucose in anoxic methanogenic paddy soil and lake sediment. FEMS Microbiology Ecology 85(3): 247-256, 1991

Seasonal changes in fish abundance, biomass and species richness in the littoral zone of a large European lake, Lake Constance, Germany. Archiv fuer Hydrobiologie 139(4): 433-448, 1997