EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in general practice



Antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in general practice



Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety 8(2): 95-104



Objectives - (1) To describe interpractice variation in diagnosis of respiratory infections at consultation. (2) To test the hypotheses that: (a) The decision to prescribe an antibiotic in respiratory infection is influenced by the diagnosis, the perceived certainty of diagnosis, and whether or not a consultation takes place. (b) The choice of antibiotic is influenced by the diagnosis. Design - A regional survey of prescribing and associated morbidity in general practice, over a 2-week period in April 1994. Setting - Stratified quota sample of 22 Northern Ireland practices. Results - There was wide interpractice variation in diagnosis of common respiratory infections at consultation, especially tonsillitis (5.0-157.5/1000 consultations). Overall, different diagnoses predicted the decision to prescribe an antibiotic at different levels (coryza 42.3%, tonsillitis 84.8%), but there was wide interpractice variation in the decision to prescribe for most diagnoses. With the exception ofcoryza and sinusitis, the perceived certainty of diagnosis did not significantly influence the decision to prescribe. The decision to prescribe was not significantly influenced by whether or not a consultation took place. Overall, broad spectrum penicillins were the therapeutic group most frequently prescribed for a given diagnosis with the exception of tonsillitis (phenoxymethylpenicillin) and sinusitis (tetracyclines), but there was wide interpractice variation in choice of antibiotic. Conclusions - Little consensus exists among practices regarding rational prescribing decisions in respiratory illness. The absence of a consultation was no deterrent to antibiotic prescribing. At one extreme, it is suggested that some practices are avoiding consultations for respiratory infections. There is wide variation in choice of antibiotic, despite existing guidelines.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 010183510

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 15073934

DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1557(199903/04)8:2<95::AID-PDS396>3.0.CO;2-K



Related references

Antibiotic prescribing in acute respiratory tract infections in general practice. Anales de Pediatria 82(6): 412-416, 2014

Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in general practice: Comparison between Denmark and Iceland. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care 33(4): 269-274, 2016

Upper respiratory tract infections in general practice: Diagnosis, antibiotic prescribing, duration of symptoms and use of diagnostic Tests. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 34(12): 880-886, 2002

Upper respiratory tract infections in general practice: diagnosis, antibiotic prescribing, duration of symptoms and use of diagnostic tests. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 34(12): 880-886, 2003

Management of upper respiratory tract infections in Dutch general practice; antibiotic prescribing rates and incidences in 1987 and 2001. Family Practice 23(2): 175-179, 2006

Improving antibiotic prescribing in acute respiratory tract infections: cluster randomised trial from Norwegian general practice (prescription peer academic detailing (Rx-PAD) study). Bmj 347(): F4403-F4403, 2013

Rationale, design and organization of the delayed antibiotic prescription (DAP) trial: a randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies in the non-complicated acute respiratory tract infections in general practice. Bmc Family Practice 14(): 63-63, 2013

Reducing general practice trainees' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and online educational intervention. Education for Primary Care 27(2): 98-105, 2016

Respiratory tract infections in general practice: considerable differences in prescribing habits between general practitioners in Denmark and Spain. European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 60(1): 23-28, 2003

Diagnostic labelling as determinant of antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract episodes in general practice. Bmc Family Practice 8(): 55-55, 2007

Prescribing patterns for upper respiratory tract infections in general practice in France and in the Netherlands. European Journal of Public Health 18(3): 312-316, 2007

Enabling factors for antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections: perspectives of Lithuanian and Russian general practitioners. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences 118(2): 98-104, 2013

Antibiotic prescribing practice for acute, uncomplicated respiratory tract infections in primary care settings in New Delhi, India. Tropical Medicine & International Health 19(7): 761-768, 2014

Prescribing habits of general practitioners in choosing an empirical antibiotic regimen for lower respiratory tract infections in adults in Sicily. Pharmacological Research 40(1): 47-52, 1999

Reducing early career general practitioners' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: a pragmatic prospective non-randomised controlled trial. Family Practice 35(1): 53-60, 2017