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Comparative analysis of the in vitro proliferation and expansion of hematopoietic progenitors from patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplasia



Comparative analysis of the in vitro proliferation and expansion of hematopoietic progenitors from patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplasia



Leukemia Research 26(10): 955-963, October



Aplastic anemia (AA) and myelodysplasia (MDS) show great similarities in their biology. To date, however, it is still unclear to what extent hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) from AA and MDS share biological properties and what the functional differences are between them. In trying to address this issue, in the present study we have analyzed, in a comparative manner, the proliferation and expansion capacities of bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells from AA and MDS in response to recombinant cytokines. BM samples from normal subjects (NBM) and patients with AA and MDS were enriched for HPC by immunomagnetic-based negative selection. Selected cells were cultured in the absence (control) or in the presence of early-acting cytokines (Mix I), or early, intermediate- and late-acting cytokines (Mix II). Proliferation and expansion were assessed periodically. In NBM and MDS cultures apoptosis was also determined. In NBM cultures, Mix I induced a nine-fold increase in total cell numbers and a 3.6-fold increase in colony-forming cell (CFC) numbers. In Mix II-supplemented cultures, total cells were increased 643-fold, and CFC 12.4-fold. In AA cultures, no proliferation or expansion were observed in Mix I-supplemented cultures, whereas only a four-fold increase in total cell numbers was observed in the presence of Mix II. In MDS cultures, a 12-fold increase in total cells and a 2.9-fold increase in CFC were observed in the presence of Mix I; on the other hand, Mix II induced a 224-fold increase in total cells and a 5.9-fold increase in CFC. Apoptosis was reduced in cytokine-supplemented cultures from NBM. In contrast, Mix II induced a significant increase in the rate of apoptosis in MDS cultures. Our results demonstrate that, as compared to their normal counterparts, AA and MDS progenitors are deficient in their proliferation and expansion potentials. Such a deficiency is clearly more pronounced in AA cells, which seem to be unable to respond to several cytokines. MDS progenitors, on the other hand, are capable to proliferate and expand in response to cytokines; however, their rate of apoptosis is increased by intermediate-and late-acting cytokines, so that the overall proliferation and expansion are significantly lower than those of normal progenitor cells.

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Accession: 010350669

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 12163058

DOI: 10.1016/s0145-2126(02)00042-5



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