+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Efficacy of speech therapy in children with language disorders: Specific language impairment compared with language impairment in comorbidity with cognitive delay



Efficacy of speech therapy in children with language disorders: Specific language impairment compared with language impairment in comorbidity with cognitive delay



International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology 63(2): 129-136, 25 April



Objective: this article discusses the effect of speech therapy on language comprehension, language production and non-verbal functioning in two groups of children with developmental language disorders. Design: retrospective study-a follow-up after a mean of 2 years. Materials and methods: verbal and non-verbal functioning before and after therapy were examined in 31 language-impaired children with normal hearing and good health. In 16 children the language functioning was substantial behind their non-verbal functioning. They were categorised as children with specific language impairment (SLI). In 15 children the language problem was in comorbidity with cognitive delay, and these were categorised as children with non-SLI. At the first examination the children were at the age of 1;5-5;4 years and at the second examination they were at the age of 3;4-6;11 years. The children were examined for language comprehension (Standardised Dutch version of the Reynell Developmental Comprehension Scale), spontaneous language production (Groningen Diagnostic Speech norms) and non-verbal functioning (Snijders-Oomen non-verbal intelligence scale for children between 2 1/2 and 7 years). Results: in both groups, a significant improvement was found in language functioning as well as in non-verbal functioning. Language comprehension and non-verbal IQ-scores in both groups improved by about the same amount. Language production made significantly more progress in the SLI group than in the non-SLI group. The improvements in the SLI group were mainly reached by speech therapy, whereas in the non-SLI group this was less the case. Conclusions: verbal and non-verbal development can improve in young children with developmental language delay. This underlines the idea that language and cognitive development are interacting and influencing each other in a positive way. Children with SLI seem to benefit more from speech therapy, whereas children with cognitive delay seem to benefit more from special education.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 010571002

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 11955604

DOI: 10.1016/s0165-5876(02)00004-6


Related references

Manifestation of speech and language disorders in children with hearing impairment compared with children with specific language disorders. Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology 36(1): 12-20, 2011

Speech perception and phonological short-term memory capacity in language impairment: preliminary evidence from adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders 45(3): 275-286, 2010

Language learning in Down syndrome: the speech and language profile compared to adolescents with cognitive impairment of unknown origin. Down's Syndrome Research and Practice 10(2): 61-66, 2006

Prevalence of speech delay in 6-year-old children and comorbidity with language impairment. Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research 42(6): 1461-1481, 1999

Evaluation of speech and language therapy interventions for pre-school children with specific language impairment: a comparison of outcomes following specialist intensive, nursery-based and no intervention. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders 44(5): 616-638, 2010

Influence of Language Load on Speech Motor Skill in Children With Specific Language Impairment. Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research 61(3): 675-689, 2018

Speech-Language Pathologists' Clinical Decision Making for Children With Specific Language Impairment. Language Speech and Hearing Services in Schools 50(2): 283-307, 2019

Is speech and language therapy effective for children with primary speech and language impairment? Report of a randomized control trial. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders 46(6): 628-640, 2014

A comparative study of the phonology of pre-school children with specific language impairment (SLI), language delay (LD) and normal acquisition. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics 16(8): 573-596, 2002

An examination of how speech and language therapists assess and diagnose children with specific language impairment in Ireland. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 10(6): 425-437, 2008

Oral language and narrative skills in children with specific language impairment with and without literacy delay: a three-year longitudinal study. Research in Developmental Disabilities 33(6): 1857-1870, 2013

Repair in speech and language therapy interaction: Investigating pragmatic language impairment of children. Child Language Teaching and Therapy 21(2): 191-212, 2005

Auditory processing and speech perception in children with specific language impairment: relations with oral language and literacy skills. Research in Developmental Disabilities 33(2): 635-644, 2012

Cognitive predictors of language development in children with specific language impairment (SLI). International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders 44(5): 639-655, 2010

Cognitive approach to assessing pragmatic language comprehension in children with specific language impairment. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders 43(4): 427-447, 2008