+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Growing vegetables in developing countries for local urban populations and export markets: problems confronting small-scale producers



Growing vegetables in developing countries for local urban populations and export markets: problems confronting small-scale producers



Pest Management Science 59(5): 575-582



Vegetables attract high applications of pesticides, and farmers in developing countries use many acutely toxic insecticides to control pests on these crops. With the liberalisation of agricultural markets in developing countries, the number of small-scale farmers growing vegetables for both domestic and export markets is increasing. Demand for supplies of year-round and exotic fruit and vegetables has grown in industrialised countries, but with rising quality standards and traceability requirements it is difficult for small-scale farmers to benefit from this lucrative non-traditional agricultural export trade. The demand is high for vegetables in the expanding cities in developing countries, and farmers in peri-urban areas, or rural areas with good access to the cities, are in a position to find a growing market for their produce. Poor storage facilities will often mean that farmers are forced to sell at peak times when prices are low. Farmers rarely have access to training in pesticide use, and have only limited or no access to advice on the complicated management of pesticides. The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN is concerned about high levels of poor quality and adulterated pesticides on sale in developing countries. Surveys repeatedly show that without training, farmers are unable to make good crop decisions: recognition of pests and their predators is generally low, leading to decisions to spray to kill any insect; knowledge of product selection, application rates and timing is poor; different products are often combined in the belief that the effect will be greater; re-entry periods after spraying and essential harvest intervals are not known; and without knowledge of alternatives, farmers will often assume that the only solution to pest problems is to spray more frequently. From a consumer's point of view, few developing countries are able to monitor pesticide residues, particularly for produce grown for home consumption: most countries do not have laboratories for even simple residue testing. Changes in European Maximum Residue Limits means that export crops will be rejected if they contain residues at the Limit of Detection of pesticides not registered in Europe. Season-long field level training in Integrated Pest Management can help farmers to become better decision-makers, and to greatly reduce pesticide use while reducing risks to their own health and environment, producing safer products for consumers, maintaining yields, and increasing incomes.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 010725448

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 12741526

DOI: 10.1002/ps.654


Related references

Access to urban markets for small-scale producers of indigenous cereals: a qualitative study of consumption practices and potential demand among urban consumers in Polokwane. Development Southern Africa 22(1): 125-141, 2005

World markets for organic fruit and vegetables: opportunities for developing countries in the production and export of organic horticultural products. World markets for organic fruit and vegetables Opportunities for developing countries in the production and export of organic horticultural products : 312 pp., 2001

An analysis of problems confronting part-time and full-time small-scale vegetable producers in Mississippi. Proceedings of the Annual Professional Agricultural Workers Conference: 7th) 151-161, 1989

Global standards and local knowledge building: upgrading small producers in developing countries. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 109(31): 12344-9, 2012

Problems confronting the (EEC) markets for fruit and vegetables and inedible horticultural preducts. Ber. Landw, 44: 1, 1-18, 1966

Reconnecting Markets: Innovative Global Practices in Connecting Small-scale Producers with Dynamic Food Markets. Food Culture and Society An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research 15(4): 695-697, 2012

Producers vs. consumers price parity for the vegetables in rural and urban markets of southern Karnataka. Agricultural Marketing 46(4): 32-34, 2004

Export opportunities in world markets for honey from developing countries. Proceedings Development of world apicultural trade: ub 1978) 13-20, 1978

Export opportunities in world markets for beeswax from developing countries. Proceedings Development of world apicultural trade: ub 1978) 21-27, 1978

Export credits build markets in developing countries U.S. food products. Foreign agriculture United States Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service 20(7): 16-17, 1982

Special characteristics and problems of small scale fisheries management in developing countries. Miles, E , R Pealy And R Stokes (Ed ) Natural Resources Economics And Policy Applications: Essays in Honor Of James A Crutchfield Xv+440p University Of Washington Press: Seattle, Washington, Usa; London, England, Uk Illus Maps 118-151, 1986

Conceptual evaluation of urban and peri-urban production and marketing of fruits and vegetables in developing countries. Urban and peri urban agriculture in Africa: proceedings of a workshop, Netanya, Israel, 23-27 June 1996: 267-296, 1999

Will the Finnish plywood and particle board industry lose its export markets to developing countries?. Paperi ja puu: 56 (11) 853-854, 1974

Hänninen lecture: problems and prevention: research in developing countries and immigrant populations from developing countries. Neurotoxicology 28(2): 207-214, 2007

Developing countries seen as growing markets for oils. 1978