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Hospital-based survey of doctors' attitudes to adverse drug reactions and perception of drug-related risk for adverse reaction occurrence



Hospital-based survey of doctors' attitudes to adverse drug reactions and perception of drug-related risk for adverse reaction occurrence



Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety 8 Suppl 1: S27-S35



Doctors' attitudes to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and perception of drug-related risk for ADR occurrence were investigated in four hospitals in Northern Italy using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. ADRs were a relevant concern in medical practice for 80% of the respondents and had been observed by 87%. ADRs were perceived to occur in no more than 5% of hospitalized patients and serious ADRs in less than 1%. The response patterns, however, differed according to the ward of work and the year of graduation of the doctors. Antibacterials, NSAIDs and antiarrhythmics were rated as higher risk drugs, while diuretics, lipid lowering agents, antihistamines, antiemetics and antispasmodics were rated as lower risk drugs. Risk perception was dishomogeneous mainly with respect to the ward of work. The estimated frequency of ADR occurrence, the perception of drug-related risk and previous ADR reporting behaviour were clearly correlated. The present results suggest that personal factors affect doctors' attitudes to ADRs, perception of drug-related risk and ADR reporting behaviour and may thus be relevant in developing and targeting educational strategies aimed at increasing awareness of ADRs and at encouraging ADR reporting.

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Accession: 010760896

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 15073884

DOI: 10.1002/(sici)1099-1557(199904)8:1+3.0.co;2-q


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