EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Iron and ascorbic acid concentrations in human dermis with regard to age and body sites



Iron and ascorbic acid concentrations in human dermis with regard to age and body sites



Gerontology 49(2): 117-122



Background: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to processes relating to cutaneous aging. Iron catalyses ROS formation whereas ascorbic acid (AA) plays a fundamental role in defending the organism against undesirable ROS action. Objective: The aim of this work was to determine the ex vivo iron and AA concentrations in human dermis from different age groups to better understand their role. Methods: Skin fragments were collected from 66 female patients during surgical operations and were grouped according to age: group I (<15 years, before puberty, n=12), group II (15-50 years, adults, n=42), and group III (>50 years, advanced age adults, n=12). Two sites were investigated: the abdomen (unexposed areas) and face (exposed sites). Iron and AA were collected from human dermis by microdialysis and assessed by atomic absorption spectrometry and gas chromatography mass spectrometry, respectively. Results: Iron concentrations in the dermis were significantly higher in group III (27.4+-20.9 mug/l) than in group I (13.8+-3.3 mug/l; p<0.05). An inverse correlation between AA dermis levels and increasing age was detected. For groups III and I, iron and AA concentrations were significantly different in dermis from the face compared to that of the abdomen (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study shows for the first time that there is a direct relationship between iron and AA concentrations in the dermis and aging. Moreover, iron and AA concentrations differed according to body site.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 010885001

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 12574671

DOI: 67951



Related references

High iron and low ascorbic acid concentrations in the dermis of atopic dermatitis patients. Dermatology 207(3): 261-264, 2003

In vivo assessment of iron and ascorbic acid in psoriatic dermis. Acta Dermato-Venereologica 84(1): 2-5, 2004

Iron concentrations in human dermis assessed by microdialysis associated with atomic absorption spectrometry. Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin 24(1): 10-13, 2001

Ascorbic acid assessment in human dermis by a microdialysis technique associated with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. European Journal of Mass Spectrometry 6(5): 397-404, 2000

Assessment of drinking water fortification with iron plus ascorbic Acid or ascorbic Acid alone in daycare centers as a strategy to control iron-deficiency anemia and iron deficiency: a randomized blind clinical study. Journal of Tropical Pediatrics 60(1): 40-46, 2014

Effect of dietary copper iron and ascorbic acid levels on hematology blood and tissue copper iron and zinc concentrations and copper 64 and iron 59 metabolism in young pigs. Journal of Nutrition 104(5): 532-541, 1974

Growth ascorbic acid and iron contents of tissues of young guinea pigs whose dams received high or low levels of dietary ascorbic acid or iron during pregnancy and suckling. British Journal of Nutrition 60(3): 487-498, 1988

Interrelationship of dietary ascorbic acid and iron on the tissue distribution of ascorbic acid, iron and copper in female guinea pigs. Journal of Nutrition 110(7): 1398-1408, 1980

Evaluation of a sunscreen photoprotective effect by ascorbic acid assessment in human dermis using microdialysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Experimental Dermatology 14(3): 176-181, 2005

Observations on ascorbic acid and iron concentrations in the blood of students. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 31(2): 84a-85a, 1972

Effect of ascorbic acid on iron absorption from different types of meals. Studies with ascorbic-acid-rich foods and synthetic ascorbic acid given in different amounts with different meals. Human Nutrition. Applied Nutrition 40(2): 97-113, 1986

The relation between the distribution of iron and ascorbic acid in the body. British Journal of Experimental Pathology 33(5): 419-427, 1952

Body iron distribution and ascorbic acid status. Central African Journal of Medicine 22(11): 223-227, 1976

Depletion and repletion of ascorbic acid in the rhesus monkey macaca mulatta relationship between ascorbic acid concentration in blood components with total body pool and liver concentration of ascorbic acid. International Journal for Vitamin & Nutrition Research 51(1): 47-53, 1981

Depletion and repletion of ascorbic acid in the Rhesus monkey: relationship between ascorbic acid concentration in blood components with total body pool and liver concentration of ascorbic acid. International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research. Internationale Zeitschrift für Vitamin- und Ernahrungsforschung. Journal International de Vitaminologie et de Nutrition 51(1): 47-53, 1981