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Iron methionine (FeMET) and iron sulfate (FeSO4) as sources of dietary iron for juvenile abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino



Iron methionine (FeMET) and iron sulfate (FeSO4) as sources of dietary iron for juvenile abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino



Journal of Shellfish Research 19(2): 861-868



The minimum dietary iron requirement and its bioavailability were determined for juvenile abalone (Haliotis discus hannai Ino.) using casein-gelatin-based diets supplemented with 0, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, and 200 mg iron/kg from iron methionine (FeMet) or iron sulfate heptahydrate (FeSO4 [cntdot] 7H2O). The experimental diets containing graded levels of dietary iron (24.9-212.7 mg iron/kg) provided as either FeMet or FeSO4 were fed to juvenile abalone. Abalone juveniles of similar size were distributed in a flow-through system using a completely randomized design with thirteen treatments and three replicates of each treatment. Abalone fed the basal diet without iron supplementation exhibited significantly lower survival and carcass protein than the other groups. The average weight gain rate (WGR, %), daily increment in shell length (DISL, [mu]m/day), and soft-body iron concentration (SB iron, [mu]g/g) of the abalone were significantly affected by dietary treatment, and responded in broken-line models to increases in dietary iron levels from the two iron sources. The optimal levels of dietary iron using FeMet and FeSO4 as the supplemental iron sources, determined by broken-line regression analysis, on the basis of maximum WGR, were 62.79 and 58.35 mg/kg, respectively. On maximum DISL, the values were 66.12 and 62.11 mg/kg, respectively, and on maximum SB iron deposition were 66.78 and 64.55 mg/kg, respectively. The content of iron and manganese in the shell, however, was maintained relatively constant regardless of dietary treatment. Significantly reduced manganese deposition in soft-body parts was observed for the abalone fed diets containing high levels ([gtoreq]100 mg/kg) of iron from FeSO4. However, this effect of excess iron on the utilization of manganese was not found when using FeMet as the iron source. Based on these results, an optimal level of dietary iron was recommended to be 65-70 mg/kg with either FeMet or FeSO4 as the iron source. This experiment also showed that the bioavailability of dietary iron from FeSO4 was as high as that from FeMet.

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