Long-term survival after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) among homosexual men in hepatitis B vaccine trial cohorts in Amsterdam, New York City, and San Francisco, 1978-1995

Koblin, B.A.; van Benthem, B.H.; Buchbinder, S.P.; Ren, L.; Vittinghoff, E.; Stevens, C.E.; Coutinho, R.A.; van Griensven, G.J.

American Journal of Epidemiology 150(10): 1026-1030

1999


ISSN/ISBN: 0002-9262
PMID: 10568617
Accession: 010937241

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Abstract
Information on long-term survival after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is limited. In hepatitis B vaccine trials in Amsterdam, New York City, and San Francisco, 362 gay men were followed up to 18 years (1978-1995). The median survival time from seroconversion was 12.1 years (95% confidence interval: 11.4, 12.9). The annual risk of dying increased at a constant rate until 8 years after seroconversion and then leveled off, suggesting a group that is relatively resistant to progression. These data provide a picture of the natural history of HIV-1 infection, especially in the era prior to widespread use of highly effective treatments.