EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Long-term treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers or a combination of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers in low-risk patients after acute myocardial infarction: The ABC study



Long-term treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers or a combination of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers in low-risk patients after acute myocardial infarction: The ABC study



HeartDrug 1(1): 20-25, January-February



Background: Therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta-blockers improves the prognosis of patients with impaired ventricular function, and of patients with symptoms of heart failure after acute myocardial infarction. Long-term treatment strategies for low-risk patients after acute myocardial infarction have not as yet been elucidated by clinical studies. Objective: The objective of this study is to deliver evidence of a possible additional, long-term effect from the combination of ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers, as compared with monotherapy with ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers, for patients after acute myocardial infarction but with only slightly restricted left ventricular function, and without symptoms of heart failure. Methods: In 160 patients who have suffered myocardial infarction, but do not have appreciable impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction, i.e. ejection fraction gtoreq40%, or symptoms of heart failure, we shall administer either monotherapy with ramipril or metoprolol, or combination therapy in the form of ramipril and metoprolol. The primary end point will be the left ventricular ejection fraction after 18 months. Secondary end points will be mortality, arrhythmia, cardiac stress tolerance, development of heart failure and the need for revascularization.

(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 010937477

Download citation: RISBibTeXText



Related references

Effect of beta blockers alone, of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors alone, and of beta blockers plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on new coronary events and on congestive heart failure in older persons with healed myocardial infarcts and asymptomatic left ventricular systolic dysfunction. American Journal of Cardiology 88(11): 1298-1300, December 1, 2001

Long-term compliance with beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins after acute myocardial infarction. European Heart Journal 27(10): 1153-1158, 2006

Beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and calcium antagonists in treatment of elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction. Coronary Artery Disease 11(4): 331-338, 2000

Calcium channel blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: effectiveness in combination with diuretics or beta-blockers for treating hypertension. Vascular Health and Risk Management 3(5): 579-585, 2007

Prescribing pattern of angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers after acute myocardial infarction. Saudi Medical Journal 26(11): 1837-1839, 2005

Use of beta-Blockers, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers, and Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence A Danish Nationwide Prospective Cohort Study. 2013

Mortality benefit of long-term angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers after successful percutaneous coronary intervention in non-ST elevation acute myocardial infarction. Revista Portuguesa de Cardiologia 35(12): 645-653, 2016

Use of beta blockers, lipid lowering agents, and angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors before recurrent acute myocardial infarction. 2008

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers in long-term treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy. American Heart Journal 129(4): 754-761, 1995

Angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, or both in patients with reduced left ventricular function after myocardial infarction?. Circulation 100(18 SUPPL ): I 528, Nov 2, 1999

Incidence of and Risk Factors for Severe Adverse Events in Elderly Patients Taking Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors or Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers after an Acute Myocardial Infarction. PharmacoTherapy, 2017

Beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers: should they be stopped or not before ambulatory anaesthesia?. Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology 23(6): 687-690, 2011

Effect of beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, and statins on mortality in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. American Journal of Cardiology 102(1): 77-78, 2008

Should beta-blockers be used before angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in patients with chronic heart failure? Meta-analysis of the prognostic benefit conferred by beta-blockers in patients not receiving ACE inhibitors. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 43(5 Supplement A): 195A, March 3, 2004

Indications for digoxin use, prevalence of use of beta blockers and calcium channel blockers in older patients with prior myocardial infarction or coronary artery disease, and prevalence of use of diuretics, beta blockers, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, and calcium channel blockers in older patients with hypertension in an academic hospital-based geriatrics practice. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 45(9): S14, 1997