EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Parental obsessive-compulsive disorder as a prognostic factor in a year long fluvoxamine treatment in childhood and adolescent obsessive-compulsive disorder



Parental obsessive-compulsive disorder as a prognostic factor in a year long fluvoxamine treatment in childhood and adolescent obsessive-compulsive disorder



International Clinical Psychopharmacology 15(3): 163-168



Interest in the treatment of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has increased as our knowledge of adult OCD has expanded. Although adults are still the majority of patients, children and adolescents with OCD are being identified and treated more frequently. As this population is better identified, prognostic factors need to be addressed to improve treatment outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of family psychiatric pathology in fluvoxamine treatment outcome. Eleven children and adolescents with OCD and one of their parents participated in the study. Four parents were diagnosed with OCD, six had an Axis I diagnosis other than OCD, and one had no mental disorder (Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-Non-Patient edition (SCID-NP)). Each patient received fluvoxamine for 58 weeks. Dependent measures included the Children Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS), the NIMH-Global Obsessive Compulsive Scale (NIMH-GOCS) and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI). Based on CY-BOCS, CGI and NIMH-GOCS scores, patients with parents who have OCD showed a clinically and statistically significant reduction in symptoms from pre- to post-treatment. Patients whose parents did not have OCD also improved. However, the improvement was statistically but not clinically significant. The presence of OCD in one parent seems to modify a child's response to medication. The results suggest that family psychopathology, specifically presence of OCD, may contribute to treatment efficacy. Further research is suggested in this area.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 011117654

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 10870874

DOI: 10.1097/00004850-200015030-00005



Related references

Family-based treatment of early childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder: the Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment Study for Young Children (POTS Jr)--a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry 71(6): 689-698, 2014

Childhood, adolescent and adult age at onset and related clinical correlates in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a report from the International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS). International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice 20(4): 210-217, 2016

Predictors of parental accommodation in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: findings from the Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment Study (POTS) trial. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 50(7): 716-725, 2011

Prevalence of Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Traits in Adults with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder versus Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders 4(): 25-29, 2015

Comorbidity of obsessive-compulsive disorder with obsessive-compulsive personality disorder: Does it imply a specific subtype of obsessive-compulsive disorder?. Psychiatry Research 177(1-2): 156-160, 2010

Is familial obsessive-compulsive disorder different from sporadic obsessive-compulsive disorder? A comparison of clinical characteristics, comorbidity and treatment response. Psychopathology 44(2): 83-89, 2011

Treatment seeking for obsessive-compulsive disorder: role of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. Comprehensive Psychiatry 44(2): 162-168, 2003

Obsessive compulsive personality disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder: clinical characteristics, diagnostic difficulties, and treatment. Annals of Clinical Psychiatry 17(4): 197-204, 2006

Fluvoxamine open-label treatment of adolescent inpatients with obsessive-compulsive disorder or depression. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 33(3): 342-348, 1994

Short- and Long-Term Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder with Fluvoxamine. Annals of Clinical Psychiatry 4(2): 77-80, 1992

Obsessive compulsive phenomena in adult obsessionality, compulsive personality disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder (neurosis). Psychiatric Journal of the University of Ottawa 12(4): 214-221, 1987

The Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale: reliability and validity for use among 5 to 8 year olds with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 39(6): 877-883, 2011

Obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents. A 6-22-year follow-up study. Clinical descriptions of the course and continuity of obsessive-compulsive symptomatology. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 3(2): 82-96, 1994

Obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents. A 6-22-year follow-up study. Clinical descriptions of the course and continuity of obsessive-compulsive symptomatology. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 3(2): 82-96, 2018

Doing Psychiatry Right: A Case of Severe Avoidant Personality Disorder with Obsessive-compulsive Personality Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Intermittent Explosive Disorder and Sexual Paraphilias. Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 36(3): 326-328, 2014