+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Self-injurious behavior in male rhesus macaques does not reflect externally directed aggression



Self-injurious behavior in male rhesus macaques does not reflect externally directed aggression



Physiology & Behavior 78(1): 33-39



Self-injurious behaviors (SIB), such as self-biting and self-wounding, have been observed in a small percentage of captive nonhuman primates. Because rhesus monkeys that exhibit SIB also tend to be more aggressive, it was hypothesized that SIB is related to externally directed aggression and is associated with contexts in which physical contact between participants is prevented. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesized relationship between SIB and outward aggression. Subjects were first presented with videotapes of conspecifics, scenery and a blank screen, and their behavior was recorded. Levels of salivary cortisol, an indicator of stress, were also measured before and after presentation of the videos. Although aggression increased when subjects viewed tapes containing conspecifics, neither cortisol levels nor self-biting behavior varied as a function of tape content. The subjects were then placed in two additional test situations: an empty room and the same room containing an unfamiliar conspecific. Aggression was significantly higher in the stranger condition compared to the empty room condition. The two situations yielded parallel increases in cortisol, suggesting that being alone was just as stressful as being paired with an unfamiliar conspecific. Self-biting rates were also similar in these two conditions. Thus, contrary to our prediction, increases in aggression did not correlate with increases in SIB. These results suggest that under similarly stressful conditions, SIB and externally directed aggression are unrelated.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 011339067

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 12536008

DOI: 10.1016/s0031-9384(02)00886-7


Related references

Self-injurious behavior in male rhesus macaques Association with aggression and stress. American Journal of Primatology 54(Supplement 1): 76-77, 2001

Extinction deficits in male rhesus macaques with a history of self-injurious behavior. American Journal of Primatology 63(2): 41-48, 2004

The effects of fluoxetine and buspirone on self-injurious and stereotypic behavior in adult male rhesus macaques. Comparative Medicine 55(1): 67-74, 2005

Effects of outdoor housing on self-injurious and stereotypic behavior in adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science 45(5): 35-43, 2006

Use of guanfacine to control self-injurious behavior in two rhesus macaques and one baboon. Comparative Medicine (Memphis) 50(4): 419-425, 2000

Fenfluramine challenge, self-injurious behavior, and aggression in rhesus monkeys. Physiology & Behavior 80(2-3): 327-331, 2003

Risk factors and remediation of self-injurious and self-abuse behavior in rhesus macaques. Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science 12(1): 61-72, 2009

Self-injurious behavior and response to human interaction as enrichment in rhesus macaques. American Journal of Primatology 60(Supplement 1): 94-95, 2003

Intersexual aggression and male sexual activity in captive rhesus macaques. Aggressive Behavior 13(6): 347-358, 1987

Effects of natal male alliances on aggression and power dynamics in rhesus macaques. American Journal of Primatology 73(8): 790-801, 2011

Human-directed contra-aggression training using positive reinforcement with single and multiple trainers for indoor-housed rhesus macaques. Applied Animal Behaviour Science 132(3-4): 178-186, 2011

Effects of extended-release injectable naltrexone on self-injurious behavior in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Comparative Medicine 62(3): 209-217, 2012

Severity and Distribution of Wounds in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Correlate with Observed Self-Injurious Behavior. Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science 54(5): 516-520, 2016

Stereotypic and self-injurious behavior in rhesus macaques: a survey and retrospective analysis of environment and early experience. American Journal of Primatology 60(1): 1-15, 2003

Use of guanfacine to control self-injurious behavior in two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and one baboon (Papio anubis). Comparative Medicine 50(4): 419-425, 2000