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Studies on the behaviour of cobalt in the rhizosphere of tomato seedlings: II- Effect of cobalt placement in soils on metal solubility and plant uptake



Studies on the behaviour of cobalt in the rhizosphere of tomato seedlings: II- Effect of cobalt placement in soils on metal solubility and plant uptake



Egyptian Journal of Soil Science 41(1-2): 137-150



An experiment, was conducted using the rhizobox system to evaluate the effect of cobalt placements (40 mug/g soil) as CoSO4.7H2O across the rhizosphere of tomato seedlings. Cobalt was localized once in the C.C., 1 mm, 2mm, 3 mm compartments individually. Two months after planting, the pH of soil suspension across the rhizosphere was determined. The solubility of Co and other heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni) was evaluated in the rhizosphere and compared to that of their contents in bulk soil. Results indicate that roots induced pH changes in the rhizosphere, the decrease in soil pH was almost 2 units in the rhizosphere compared to that of bulk soil, and pronounced in the C.C. Co hardly moved through the soil compartments, although soluble and available Co increased remarkably across the rhizosphere with different magnitudes compared to that of bulk soil. Cobalt placements at any soil compartment, except 3 mm one, increased fresh and dry weight of the plants. The influence of Co placements on the growth was more effective on roots than on shoots. The most striking accumulation and retention of Co occurred in plant roots. The large difference in Co uptake was observed when Co was added in the 1 mm compartment compared to that of other placements across the rhizosphere. The solubility of heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni) increased appreciably in the rhizosphere. The effect of different Co placement on the solubility of heavy metals are also discussed.

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