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Subsequent obstetric performance related to primary mode of delivery



Subsequent obstetric performance related to primary mode of delivery



British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 106(3): 227-232



Objective To relate subsequent obstetric performance with primary mode of delivery. Design Postal questionnaire survey of women who delivered their first child five years ago. Setting Huddersfield Royal Infirmary. Population Women who were delivered of their first baby in 1991: 250 by normal vaginal delivery; 250 by instrumental vaginal delivery; and 250 by caesarean section. Main outcome measures Answers to fixed choice questions on fear of future childbirth, number of subsequent children and reasons for no further children. Results The response rate was 64%. Overall, 222 (46.6%) women were initially frightened about future childbirth. According to mode of delivery: 93 (57.1%) after instrumental vaginal; 79 (47.9%) after caesarean section; and 50 (33.8%) after normal vaginal delivery. Five years after the primary delivery, 99 women (20.8%) were still frightened about future childbirth: instrumental vaginal group 41 (25.2%); caesarean section group 43 (26.1%); and normal vaginal group 15 (10.1%). In the group of women who were delivered by caesarean section 13% more women had not had a second child after five years compared with the normal vaginal delivery group ((P < 0.03, relative risk 1.46 (1.07-1.99)). In the group of women who had a vaginal instrumental delivery 6% more had not had a second child after five years compared with normal vaginal delivery group. Of the women who had no further children, 30% who had caesarean section and 28% vaginal instrumental delivery had involuntary infertility. Conclusions Caesarean section or vaginal instrumental delivery leaves many mothers frightened about future childbirth. Primary caesarean section and to some extent vaginal instrumental delivery is associated with an increased risk of voluntary and involuntary infertility.

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Accession: 011421209

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 10426641

DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.1999.tb08235.x


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