+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Amygdala c-Fos induction corresponds to unconditioned and conditioned aversive stimuli but not to freezing



Amygdala c-Fos induction corresponds to unconditioned and conditioned aversive stimuli but not to freezing



Behavioural Brain Research 152(1): 109-120



These experiments examined the relationship between freezing and c-Fos expression in the amygdala. In Experiment 1 freezing was elevated during a period immediately following shock in rats that remained in the shock context, but not in rats that were moved to a different, neutral context. The two groups showed equally elevated c-Fos levels in both the central (CeA) and lateral (LA) nuclei. In Experiment 2 rats were shocked in one compartment (paired) and not shocked in another, distinct compartment (unpaired). Rats re-exposed to the paired compartment 24h later froze more than rats exposed to the unpaired compartment, and rats in both groups froze more than un-shocked rats. c-Fos protein expression in CeA, LA and basolateral (BLA) nucleus was elevated in the rats exposed to the paired compartment but not in rats exposed to the unpaired compartment. Thus, c-Fos expression was induced by exposure to both unconditioned and conditioned stimuli, although it is unclear if the same cell population was activated in both cases. Neither case of c-Fos expression coincided with the occurrence of freezing. c-Fos expression may represent neural activity in LA and CeA produced by exposure to unconditioned cues and activity in BLA, LA and CeA produced by conditioned cues. This activity may contribute to an aversive affective state (or "fear"). Behaviors promoted by this state, such as freezing, may be mediated in other brain areas, or by other neurons in the amygdala.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 011746024

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 15135974

DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2003.09.031


Related references

The lateral amygdala processes the value of conditioned and unconditioned aversive stimuli. Neuroscience 133(2): 561-569, 2005

Role of amygdala in conditioned versus unconditioned responding to aversive stimuli. Society for Neuroscience Abstract Viewer & Itinerary Planner : Abstract No 85 11, 2002

Induction of c-Fos immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain by conditioned and unconditioned aversive stimuli. Brain Research. 597(1): 41-50, 1992

Studies on the aversive classical conditioning. 3. Cardiac responses to conditioned and unconditioned defensive (aversive) stimuli. Acta Biologiae Experimentalis 22: 193-214, 1962

Classical classical transfer conditioned response interactions involving appetitive and aversive conditioned stimuli and unconditioned stimuli. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6(5): 475-477, 1975

Brain c fos immunoreactivity induced by conditioned and unconditioned aversive stimuli. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts 16(2): 1197, 1990

Buspirone decreases physiological reactivity to unconditioned and conditioned aversive stimuli. Psychopharmacology 165(3): 291-295, 2002

Blockade of N-type calcium channels in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates conditioned but not unconditioned aversive behaviour in the rat. British Journal of Pharmacology 138(Proceedings Supplement): 108P, April, 2003

Activation of brainstem catecholaminergic neurons by conditioned and unconditioned aversive stimuli as revealed by c-Fos immunoreactivity. Brain Research. 608(2): 310-318, 1993

Studies of aversive classical conditioning. 3. Cardiac responses to conditioned and unconditioned defensive stimuli. Acta Biol Exptl 22(3): 193-214, 1962

Basolateral amygdala lesions disrupt both unconditioned and conditioned freezing. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts 25(1-2): 1617, 1999

Potentiation or diminution of discrete motor unconditioned responses (rabbit eyeblink) to an aversive pavlovian unconditioned stimulus by two associative processes: conditioned fear and a conditioned diminution of unconditioned stimulus processing. Behavioral Neuroscience 106(3): 498-508, 1992

Catecholaminergic mechanisms underlying neurohypophysial hormone responses to unconditioned or conditioned aversive stimuli in rats. Experimental Physiology 85(Special Edition): 101S-110S, March, 2000