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Biodegradation of endosulfan by a soil bacterium



Biodegradation of endosulfan by a soil bacterium



Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part. B, Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes 41(6): 895-905



A study was conducted to isolate and characterize the soil bacteria capable of degrading endosulfan and to examine the nature of degradation and metabolism of endosulfan by the isolated bacteria using gas chromatography (GC) for identification of breakdown products. Using an enrichment culture technique, a bacterium capable of metabolizing endosulfan was isolated from cotton-growing soil in Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India. Microbial degradation of endosulfan was observed for 6 days. Degradation was determined by monitoring endosulfan disappearance by GC with electron capture detection. Approximately 50% microbial degradation of the compound was observed within 3 days of incubation, concomitant with an increase in bacterial biomass. Uninoculated controls retained >80% of the substrate after 6 days of incubation. However, GC analysis of acetone-hexane extracts of bacterial cultures indicated formation of endosulfan sulfate, which was the only major metabolite formed and accumulated during the incubation. The metabolites formed indicated that the organism follows an oxidative pathway for metabolism of this pesticide. Since no further degradation of endosulfan sulfate was observed, it was considered a terminal product formed by the bacteria. Bacterial metabolism of endosulfan was demonstrated by both substrate disappearance and product formation. Therefore, microbial degradation of endosulfan by a soil bacterium may provide a basis for the development of bioremediation strategies to remediate the pollutants in the environment.

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Accession: 011806852

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 16893778

DOI: 10.1080/03601230600806004



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