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Catecholamine responses to high intensity cycle ergometer exercise: body mass or body composition?



Catecholamine responses to high intensity cycle ergometer exercise: body mass or body composition?



Journal of Physiology and Biochemistry 59(2): 77-83



The purpose of this study was to compare the sympathoadrenergic and metabolic responses following 30 s of maximal high intensity cycle ergometry exercise when cradle resistive forces were derived from total-body mass (TBM) or fat-free mass (FFM). Increases in peak power output (PPO) and pedal velocity were recorded when resistive forces reflected FFM (953 +/- 114 W vs 1020 +/- 134 W; 134 +/- 8 rpm vs 141 +/- 7 rpm ; P < 0.05). No differences were observed between mean power output (MPO), fatigue index (FI%), work done (WD) or heart rate (HR) when the TBM and FFM protocols were compared. There were no differences between the TBM and FFM protocols for adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA) or blood lactate concentrations ([La-]B) recorded at rest, immediately post or 24 h post exercise. However, increases in blood concentrations of A and NA (P < 0.05) were recorded for both the TBM and FFM protocol immediately post exercise. Significant correlations (P < 0.05) were recorded between PPOs, immediate post- exercise NA and [La-]B for both the TBM and FFM protocols. [La-]B levels were also significantly elevated (P < 0.01) immediately post exercise for both the TBM and FFM protocols. The results from this study suggest that greater peak power outputs are obtainable with no subsequent differences in neurophysiological or metabolic stress as determined by plasma A, NA and [La-]B concentrations when resistive forces reflect FFM and not TBM during loading procedures. The findings also indicate that immediate post exercise concentrations return to resting levels 24 h post exercise.

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Accession: 011835063

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 14649873

DOI: 10.1007/bf03179873


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