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Dorsal root ganglion neurones in culture: a model system for identifying novel analgesic targets?



Dorsal root ganglion neurones in culture: a model system for identifying novel analgesic targets?



Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods 51(3): 201-208



Ion channels represent attractive targets in the development of novel analgesics for the treatment of pain. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones in culture can share characteristics with nociceptors in vivo and are frequently used to investigate the ion channels that underlie the transduction of noxious stimuli into electrical activity during sensory processing. In this article, I describe the methods used to prepare cultures of DRG neurones including the procedures for the dissection, enzymatic dissociation and plating. The criteria used to identify putative nociceptors in vitro are reviewed and using the M-current as an example I highlight how potential analgesic targets can be identified by combining the use of the voltage clamp technique with the use of selective pharmacological agents.

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Accession: 011976138

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 15862465

DOI: 10.1016/j.vascn.2004.08.007


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