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Integrated human papillomavirus types 52 and 58 are infrequently found in cervical cancer, and high viral loads predict risk of cervical cancer



Integrated human papillomavirus types 52 and 58 are infrequently found in cervical cancer, and high viral loads predict risk of cervical cancer



Gynecologic Oncology 102(1): 54-60



Objective. The aim of this prospective study was to analyze whether integration or high viral loads of human papillomavirus (HPV) is essential for malignant transformation of HPV types 52 and 58 as well as types 16 and 18.Methods.

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Accession: 012221770

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PMID: 16386784

DOI: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2005.11.035


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