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Is diabetes an independent risk factor for mortality after myocardial infarction? The ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Surveillance Study



Is diabetes an independent risk factor for mortality after myocardial infarction? The ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Surveillance Study



Acta Diabetologica 41(2): 77-83



We investigated the age-, gender- and race-specific 1-year case fatality rates of diabetic and non-diabetic individuals with a myocardial infarction. Data were obtained from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Surveillance Study, which monitors both hospitalized myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease (CHD) deaths in residents aged 35-74 years in four communities in the USA. The study population comprised 3242 hospitalized myocardial infarctions (HMIs) in diabetic subjects and 9826 HMIs in non-diabetic individuals between 1987 and 1997. Age-adjusted and gender- and race-specific odds ratios (OR) for 1-year case fatality comparing diabetic to non-diabetic patients were 2.0 (95% CI, 1.6-2.4) for white men and 1.4 (95% CI, 1.1-1.8) for white women. Further adjustment for severity of HMI, history of previous MI, stroke and hypertension, and therapy variables showed significantly higher case fatality in white diabetic men than in non-diabetic white men (OR=1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.9), but no significant association in the other race-gender groups. The age-adjusted odds of out of hospital death was significantly higher among white diabetic men (OR=1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.3), white women (OR=2.3; 95% CI, 1.4-3.8), and African-American women (OR=2.9; 95% CI, 1.5-5.9) as compared to their non-diabetic counterparts. In conclusion, diabetes is an independent factor for mortality within one year following a myocardial infarction among white men, and following out-of hospital coronary death in white men and women and in African-American women. It is possible that these differences could be explained, at least in part, by a less than optimal medical management of the high cardiovascular risk profile of these patients after hospital discharge.

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Accession: 012239963

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 15224209

DOI: 10.1007/s00592-004-0148-9



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