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Microarray and real-time RT-PCR analyses of differential human gene expression patterns induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus infection of Vero cells



Microarray and real-time RT-PCR analyses of differential human gene expression patterns induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus infection of Vero cells



Microbes and Infection 7(2): 248-259



Vero E6 African green monkey kidney cells are highly susceptible to infection with the newly emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and they are permissive for rapid viral replication, with resultant cytopathic effects. We employed cDNA microarray analysis to characterize the cellular transcriptional responses of homologous human genes at 12 h post-infection. Seventy mRNA transcripts belonging to various functional classes exhibited significant alterations in gene expression. There was considerable induction of heat shock proteins that are crucial to the immune response mechanism. Modified levels of several transcripts involved in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory processes exemplified the balance between opposing forces during SARS pathogenesis. Other genes displaying altered transcription included those associated with host translation, cellular metabolism, cell cycle, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, protein trafficking, protein modulators, and cytoskeletal proteins. Alterations in the levels of several novel transcripts encoding hypothetical proteins and expressed sequence tags were also identified. In addition, transcription of apoptosis-related genes DENN and hIAP1 was upregulated in contrast to FAIM. Elevated Mx1 expression signified a strong host response to mediate antiviral resistance. Also expressed in infected cells was the C-terminal alternative splice variant of the p53 tumor suppressor gene encoding a modified truncated protein that can influence the activity of wild-type p53. We observed the interplay between various mechanisms to favor virus multiplication before full-blown apoptosis and the triggering of several pathways in host cells in an attempt to eliminate the pathogen. Microarray analysis identifies the critical host-pathogen interactions during SARS-CoV infection and provides new insights into the pathophysiology of SARS.

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Accession: 012304168

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 15777647

DOI: 10.1016/j.micinf.2004.11.004


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