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Occurrence of two types of Hynobius naevius in Northern Kyushu, Japan (Amphibia: Urodela)



Occurrence of two types of Hynobius naevius in Northern Kyushu, Japan (Amphibia: Urodela)



Zoological Science 20(12): 1467-1476



A survey to examine genetic variation among Hynobius naevius from four localities of Fukuoka Pref., northern Kyushu, Japan, resulted in the detection of two, sympatric, genetic types (A and B) that are clearly different in the allelic frequencies of four loci (ACOH-A, ACOH-B, ADH-A, and SOD-A) in each locality. Morphological investigations between the two genetic types also proved that they are clearly discriminated; the type A is about 75 mm in SVL, lacks mottling pattern on bluish purple dorsum, and possesses relatively short vomerine teeth series, while the type B is about 60 mm in SVL, and has light mottling on reddish purple ground color. These results strongly suggest that reproductive isolation occurs between these two types, and that they could be regarded as separate species. Populations from Toyota-cho, western Honshu, and Yabe-machi, central Kyushu, both close to Fukuoka Pref., were very similar to the types A and B, respectively. From these results, we consider that two evolutionary lineages that first evolved allopatrically in western Honshu and southern Kyushu secondarily contacted and became sympatric in the region of northern Kyushu.

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Accession: 012371693

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PMID: 14709811

DOI: 10.2108/zsj.20.1467


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