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Optimal sampling time after preparation of platelet concentrates for detection of bacterial contamination by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction



Optimal sampling time after preparation of platelet concentrates for detection of bacterial contamination by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction



Vox Sanguinis 89(4): 208-214



A universal quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), based on bacterial 16S rDNA, to detect bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs), was developed previously and compared with automated culturing. In the present study, this real-time PCR method was evaluated to determine the optimal sampling time for screening of bacterial contamination in PCs. Routinely prepared PCs were spiked with suspensions of Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Propionibacterium acnes to 1, 10 and 100 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml and stored at room temperature for 7 days. The presence of bacteria in these PCs was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR. As a reference method (additional control), BacT/Alert automated culturing was used. For PCR, 1-ml aliquots were drawn from all (spiked) PCs on days 0, 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7 of storage. As a control, triplicate samples (10 ml) were inoculated into aerobic and anaerobic BacT/Alert culture bottles immediately after spiking (day 0) and after storage for 1, 2, 3, 6 or 7 days. With quantitative real-time PCR, all bacterial species tested were reproducibly detected on day 1 after spiking at original concentrations of 10 and 100 CFU/ml. Bacteria were also detected on day 1 from PCs spiked with an initial concentration of 1 CFU/ml, except for E. coli, which was detected in only one of the three samples and P. aeruginosa, for which analysis was not performed on day 1. With the reference method, bacteria were detected in culture bottles (inoculated on day 0) within a mean time of 20.1 h, with the exception of P. acnes which was detected at a mean time of 102.3 and 49.3 h (for original spiking concentrations of 10 and 100 CFU/ml respectively). PCR enables the rapid detection of low initial numbers of bacteria in PCs. For reliable detection, our results support that sampling of PCs for real-time PCR screening should not be carried out earlier than 1 day after preparation (48 h after blood collection). Importantly, the real-time PCR approach has the potential to be used before the release of PCs from the blood centre or shortly before they are transfused in the hospital.

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Accession: 012378946

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 16262753

DOI: 10.1111/j.1423-0410.2005.00707.x


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