+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Persistence and mobility of a Clostridium botulinum spore population introduced to soil with spiked compost



Persistence and mobility of a Clostridium botulinum spore population introduced to soil with spiked compost



Fems Microbiology Ecology 58(3): 384-393



In a recent study it could be shown that compost samples can contain Clostridium botulinum. It was investigated if C. botulinum introduced with compost into botulinum-free soil can persist and be translocated within the soil. Compost was spiked with two C. botulinum type D spore concentrations (103 and 105 spores g-1) and the composts were spread on an experimental site. Over a period of 939 days, samples were taken from the upper (0-5 cm) and the lower (10-30 cm) soil horizons.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 012406037

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 17117983

DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6941.2006.00183.x


Related references

Proteases of clostridium botulinum part 5 studies on the serological relationship between proteases from clostridium botulinum and other spore forming bacteria. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 14(5): 700-711, 1973

Proteases of Clostridium botulinum. V. Studies on the serological relationship between proteases from Clostridium botulinum and other spore-forming bacteria. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 14(5): 700-711, 1973

Production of types A and B spores of Clostridium botulinum by the biphasic method: effect on spore population, radiation resistance, and toxigenicity. Applied Microbiology 23(4): 734-739, 1972

Spore germination, growth, and spore formation by Clostridium botulinum in relation to the water content of the substrate. Food Res 18(1): 35-39, 1953

Characterization of the spore surface and exosporium proteins of Clostridium sporogenes; implications for Clostridium botulinum group I strains. Food Microbiology 59: 205-212, 2016

Functional characterisation of germinant receptors in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium sporogenes presents novel insights into spore germination systems. Plos Pathogens 10(9): E1004382, 2014

Production of type a and type b spores of clostridium botulinum by the biphasic method effect on spore population radiation resistance and toxigenicity. Applied Microbiology 23(4): 734-739, 1972

Proteases of clostridium botulinum part 6 the role of trypsin clostridium botulinum proteases and protease inhibitors in the formation and activation of toxin in growing cultures of clostridium botulinum. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 15(4): 487-506, 1974

Molecular characterization of the clusters of genes encoding the botulinum neurotoxin complex in Clostridium botulinum (Clostridium argentinense) type G and nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum type B. Current Microbiology 35(4): 207-214, 1997

Proteases of Clostridium botulinum. VI. The role of trypsin, Clostridium botulinum proteases and protease inhibitors in the formation and activation of toxin in growing cultures of Clostridium botulinum. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 15(4): 487-506, 1974

Prevalence of clostridium botulinum type e and coexistence of clostridium botulinum nonproteolytic type b in the river soil of japan. Microbiology & Immunology 36(6): 583-591, 1992

Incidence of clostridia in pigs slaughtered carcasses clostridium perfringens clostridium parabotulinum clostridium sporogenes clostridium noryi clostridium bifermentans clostridium lentoputrescens clostridium botulinum. Acta Veterinaria Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae 17(2): 179-182, 1967

Evaluation of the immunofluorescence test in the diagnosis of botulinum toxin poisoning in humans and animals. II. Identification of Clostridium botulinum in the soil from the shores, bottom silt and water of the Konopno Lake, a source of infection of fish with Cl. botulinum E. Przeglad Epidemiologiczny 28(4): 453-460, 1974

Development of real-time PCR tests for detecting botulinum neurotoxins A, B, E, F producing Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium baratii and Clostridium butyricum. Journal of Applied Microbiology 107(2): 465-473, 2010