+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Stability of SARS coronavirus in human specimens and environment and its sensitivity to heating and UV irradiation



Stability of SARS coronavirus in human specimens and environment and its sensitivity to heating and UV irradiation



Biomedical and Environmental Sciences 16(3): 246-255



Objective: The causal agent for SARS is considered as a novel coronavirus that has never been described both in human and animals previously. The stability of SARS coronavirus in human specimens and in environments was studied. Methods: Using a SARS coronavirus strain CoV-P9, which was isolated from pharyngeal swab of a probable SARS case in Beijing, its stability in mimic human specimens and in mimic environment including surfaces of commonly used materials or in household conditions, as well as its resistances to temperature and UV irradiation were analyzed. A total of 106 TCID50 viruses were placed in each tested condition, and changes of the viral infectivity in samples after treatments were measured by evaluating cytopathic effect (CPE) in cell line Vero-E6 at 48 h after infection. Results: The results showed that SARS coronavirus in the testing condition could survive in serum, 1:20 diluted sputum and feces for at least 96 h, whereas it could remain alive in urine for at least 72 h with a low level of infectivity. The survival abilities on the surfaces of eight different materials and in water were quite comparable, revealing reduction of infectivity after 72 to 96 h exposure. Viruses stayed stable at 4degreeC, at room temperature (20degreeC) and at 37degreeC for at least 2 h without remarkable change in the infectious ability in cells, but were converted to be non-infectious after 90-, 60- and 30-min exposure at 56degreeC, at 67degreeC and at 75degreeC, respectively. Irradiation of UV for 60 min on the virus in culture medium resulted in the destruction of viral infectivity at an undetectable level. Conclusion: The survival ability of SARS coronavirus in human specimens and in environments seems to be relatively strong. Heating and UV irradiation can efficiently eliminate the viral infectivity.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 012579358

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 14631830


Related references

Development of a quantitative assay for SARS coronavirus and correlation of GAPDH mRNA with SARS coronavirus in clinical specimens. Journal of Clinical Pathology 58(3): 276-280, 2005

Differential sensitivities of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus spike polypeptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein ELISA for serodiagnosis of SARS coronavirus pneumonia. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 43(7): 3054-3058, 2005

Anti-SARS virus antibody responses against human SARS-associated coronavirus and animal SARS-associated coronavirus-like virus. Chinese Medical Journal 117(11): 1723-1725, 2004

Mutagenesis of the transmembrane domain of the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein: refinement of the requirements for SARS coronavirus cell entry. Virology Journal 6: 230, 2009

Alisporivir inhibits MERS- and SARS-coronavirus replication in cell culture, but not SARS-coronavirus infection in a mouse model. Virus Research 228: 7, 2017

Evidence of the recombinant origin of a bat severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-like coronavirus and its implications on the direct ancestor of SARS coronavirus. Journal of Virology 82(4): 1819-1826, 2008

Difference in receptor usage between severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and SARS-like coronavirus of bat origin. Journal of Virology 82(4): 1899-1907, 2008

Detection of specific antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus nucleocapsid protein for serodiagnosis of SARS coronavirus pneumonia. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 42(5): 2306-2309, 2004

Mouse studies of SARS coronavirus-specific immune responses to recombinant replication-defective adenovirus expressing SARS coronavirus N protein. Hong Kong Medical Journal 15(Suppl. 2): 33-36, 2009

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus ORF8 Protein Is Acquired from SARS-Related Coronavirus from Greater Horseshoe Bats through Recombination. Journal of Virology 89(20): 10532-10547, 2015

Longitudinal profile of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA antibodies against the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus nucleocapsid protein in patients with pneumonia due to the SARS coronavirus. Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology 11(4): 665-668, 2004

Relative rates of non-pneumonic SARS coronavirus infection and SARS coronavirus pneumonia. Lancet 363(9412): 841-845, 2004

ADP-ribose-1"-phosphatase activities of the human coronavirus 229E and SARS coronavirus X domains. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 581: 93-96, 2006

Attachment factor and receptor engagement of SARS coronavirus and human coronavirus NL63. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 581: 219-227, 2006