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The lateral amygdala processes the value of conditioned and unconditioned aversive stimuli



The lateral amygdala processes the value of conditioned and unconditioned aversive stimuli



Neuroscience 133(2): 561-569



The amygdala is critical for acquiring and expressing conditioned fear responses elicited by sensory stimuli that predict future punishment, but there is conflicting evidence about whether the amygdala is necessary for perceiving the aversive qualities of painful or noxious stimuli that inflict primary punishment. To investigate this question, rats were fear conditioned by pairing a sequence of auditory pips (the conditioned stimulus, or CS) with a brief train of shocks to one eyelid (the unconditioned stimulus, or US). Conditioned responding to the CS was assessed by measuring freezing responses during a test session conducted 24 h after training, and unconditioned responding to the US was assessed by measuring head movements evoked by the eyelid shocks during training. We found that pre-training electrolytic lesions of the amygdala's lateral (LA) nucleus blocked acquisition of conditioned freezing to the CS, and also significantly attenuated unconditioned head movements evoked by the US. Similarly, bilateral inactivation of the amygdala with the GABA-A agonist muscimol impaired acquisition of CS-evoked freezing, and also attenuated US-evoked responses during training. However, when amygdala synaptic plasticity was blocked by infusion of the NR2B receptor antagonist ifenprodil, acquisition of conditioned freezing was impaired but shock reactivity was unaffected. These findings indicate that neural activity within the amygdala is important for both predicting and perceiving the aversive qualities of noxious stimuli, and that synaptic plasticity within LA is the mechanism by which the CS becomes associated with the US during fear conditioning.

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Accession: 012664037

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 15878802

DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2005.02.043


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