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Use of microautoradiography combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine dimethylsulfoniopropionate incorporation by marine bacterioplankton taxa



Use of microautoradiography combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine dimethylsulfoniopropionate incorporation by marine bacterioplankton taxa



Applied and Environmental Microbiology 70(8): 4648-4657



The fraction of planktonic heterotrophic bacteria capable of incorporating dissolved dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and leucine was determined at two coastal sites by microautoradioagraphy (AU). In Gulf of Mexico seawater microcosm experiments, the proportion of prokaryotes that incorporated sulfur from [(35)S]DMSP ranged between 27 and 51% of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-positive cells, similar to or slightly lower than the proportion incorporating [(3)H]leucine. In the northwest Mediterranean coast, the proportion of cells incorporating sulfur from [(35)S]DMSP increased from 5 to 42% from January to March, coinciding with the development of a phytoplankton bloom. At the same time, the proportion of cells incorporating [(3)H]leucine increased from 21 to 40%. The combination of AU and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that the Roseobacter clade (alpha-proteobacteria) accounted for 13 to 43% of the microorganisms incorporating [(35)S]DMSP at both sampling sites. Significant uptake of sulfur from DMSP was also found among members of the gamma-proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium groups. Roseobacter and gamma-proteobacteria exhibited the highest percentage of DAPI-positive cells incorporating (35)S from DMSP (around 50%). Altogether, the application of AU with [(35)S]DMSP combined with FISH indicated that utilization of S from DMSP is a widespread feature among active marine bacteria, comparable to leucine utilization. These results point toward DMSP as an important substrate for a broad and diverse fraction of marine bacterioplankton.

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Accession: 012728729

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 15294798

DOI: 10.1128/AEM.70.8.4648-4657.2004



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