+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Comparative accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy



Comparative accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy



American Journal of Sports Medicine 35(3): 427-436



Diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy is based primarily on clinical examination; however, it is commonplace to image the patellar tendon for diagnosis confirmation, with the imaging modalities of choice being magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US). The comparative accuracy of these modalities has not been established. Magnetic resonance imaging and US have good (>80%) accuracy and show substantial agreement in confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Magnetic resonance imaging and US (gray scale [GS-US] and color Doppler [CD-US]) features of 30 participants with clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy and 33 activity-matched, asymptomatic participants were prospectively compared. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and the likelihood of positive and negative test results were determined for each technique. The accuracy of MRI, GS-US, and CD-US was 70%, 83%, and 83%, respectively (P = .04; MRI vs GS-US). The likelihood of positive MRI, GS-US, and CD-US was 3.1, 4.8, and 11.6, respectively. The MRI and GS-US had equivalent specificity (82% vs 82%; P = 1.00); however, the sensitivity of GS-US was greater than MRI (87% vs 57%; P = .01). Sensitivity (70% vs 87%; P = .06) and specificity (94% vs 82%; P = .10) did not differ between CD-US and GS-US. Ultrasonography was more accurate than MRI in confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy. GS-US and CD-US may represent the best combination for confirming clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy because GS-US had the greatest sensitivity, while a positive CD-US test result indicated a strong likelihood an individual was symptomatic.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 012955084

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 17261569

DOI: 10.1177/0363546506294858


Related references

Assessing clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy with magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine 18(3): 304-305, 2008

Diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography in confirming clinically diagnosed Achilles tendinopathy: comparison with B-mode ultrasound and color Doppler imaging. Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology 41(1): 15-25, 2015

Imaging in chronic achilles tendinopathy: a comparison of ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging and surgical findings in 27 histologically verified cases. Skeletal Radiology 25(7): 615-620, 1996

Magnetic resonance imaging-based morphological and alignment assessment of the patellofemoral joint and its relationship to proximal patellar tendinopathy. Skeletal Radiology 47(3): 341-349, 2017

Volvulus of the gall bladder diagnosed by ultrasonography, computed tomography, coronal magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography. World Journal of Gastroenterology 12(28): 4599-4601, 2006

Association between obesity and magnetic resonance imaging defined patellar tendinopathy in community-based adults: a cross-sectional study. Bmc Musculoskeletal Disorders 15: 266, 2015

Factors associated with magnetic resonance imaging defined patellar tendinopathy in community-based middle-aged women: a prospective cohort study. Bmc Musculoskeletal Disorders 16: 184, 2016

Accuracy of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in confirming eligibility for active surveillance for men with prostate cancer. Cancer 119(18): 3359-3366, 2014

Re: Accuracy of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Confirming Eligibility for Active Surveillance for Men with Prostate Cancer. Journal of Urology 192(4): 1113-1114, 2014

Improved diagnostic accuracy with multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the breast using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and 3-dimensional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Investigative Radiology 49(6): 421-430, 2015

Evaluation of harvested and normal patellar tendons: a reliability analyses of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy 8(5): 275-280, 2000

Ultrasonography and Low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Common Calcanean Tendon in a Rabbit Model for Tendinopathy Research: a Descriptive Study of Normal Anatomy. Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences 19(3): 525-534, 2016

Patellar tendon length after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a comparative magnetic resonance imaging study between patellar and hamstring tendon autografts. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy 15(6): 712-719, 2007

The value of ultrasonography in the detection of meniscal tears diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 87(1): 14-20, 2007

Abscess of the iliopsoas muscle diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography. Southern Medical Journal 84(4): 509-511, 1991