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The characteristics of unbleached kraft pulps from Western Hemlock, Douglas Fir, Western Red Cedar, Loblolly Pine and Black Spruce. V. A study of the distribution of the degree of polymerization of the cellulose in the kraft pulps



The characteristics of unbleached kraft pulps from Western Hemlock, Douglas Fir, Western Red Cedar, Loblolly Pine and Black Spruce. V. A study of the distribution of the degree of polymerization of the cellulose in the kraft pulps



Tappi. 33: 2, 101-7



The average chain length and the chain-length distribution have been determined for the kraft pulps obtained from the five species by methods involving fractionation by solvent extraction. Eastern Spruce pulp closely resembles Douglas Fir pulp, while pulp from Loblolly Pine is similar to those from Western Red Cedar and Western Hemlock.

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