+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Encephalomyelitis of swine caused by a haemagglutinating virus. II. Virological studies



Encephalomyelitis of swine caused by a haemagglutinating virus. II. Virological studies



Res Vet Sci 4(4): 511-517



A virus, which causes encephalomyelitis in baby pigs, was isolated from the brains of affected piglets originating on 7 different premises. The virus was distinguished by the production of haemagglutinins for chicken erythrocytes and the formation of multinucleated giant cells in tissue cultures of pig kidney cells. The production of these giant cells was the only cytopathic effect shown in pig kidney tissue culture. Among various cell lines and primary tissue cultures used, only pig kidney cultures appeared capable of supporting the virus. It was relatively labile when exposed to temperatures exceeding 37[degree]C. but appeared quite stable at refrigerator and freezer temperatures, and in lyophilized tissue culture fluids. Ether and chloroform both proved lethal to the virus, and also removed haemagglutinating activity. Filtration experiments suggest the size of the infectious particle to be near that of enteroviruses. Antibiotic substances caused no appreciable effect on growth rate in tissue culture. The properties of haemagglutination and haemadsorption, combined with the cytopathogenicity of the virus in tissue culture, suggest the agent to be in the nature of a parainfluenza virus.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 014034166

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

Encephalomyelitis of swine caused by a haemagglutinating virus. IV. Transmission studies. Research in Veterinary Science 6(4): 482-489, 1965

Encephalomyelitis of swine caused by a haemagglutinating virus. I. Case histories. Res Vet Sci 4(4): 506-510, 1963

Encephalomyelitis of swine caused by a haemagglutinating virus. VI. Morphology of the virus. Research in Veterinary Science 12(4): 305-307, 1971

Encephalomyelitis of swine caused by a haemagglutinating virus. V. Response to metabolic inhibitors and other chemical compounds. Research in Veterinary Science 10(6): 509-513, 1969

Haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus in swine. Serological evidence for the presence of the infection in Denmark. Nordisk Veterinaermedicin 27(4): 208-212, 1975

Susceptibility of rats of different ages to inoculation with swine haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (a coronavirus) by various routes. Journal of Comparative Pathology 125(1): 8, 2001

Neurotropism of swine haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (coronavirus) in mice depending upon host age and route of infection. Journal of Comparative Pathology 130(1): 58-65, 2004

Neurotropism of swine haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (coronavirus) in mice depending upon host age and route of infection. Journal of Comparative Pathology 130(1): 58-65, 2004

Sequence of the 3'-terminal end (8.1 kb) of the genome of porcine haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus: comparison with other haemagglutinating coronaviruses. Journal of General Virology 83(Pt 10): 2411-2416, 2002

Assay of the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of haemagglutinating swine encephalomyelitis virus (HEV) in HPCDIR pigs. Preparation of monospecific anti-HEV serum. Archiva Veterinaria 17: 13-22, 1985

Pigs with highly prevalent antibodies to human coronavirus and swine haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus in the Tohoku District of Japan. Epidemiology and Infection 122(3): 545-551, 1999

Encephalomyelitis of swine caused by a haemag-glutinating virus. III. Serological studies. Res vet. Sci 5: 294-302, 1964

Immunopathological and ultrastructural studies on the tonsil of gnotobiotic pigs infected with strain 67N of haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus. Journal of Comparative Pathology 100(3): 305-312, 1989