EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

The comparative energy requirements of sheep and cattle for maintenance and gain



The comparative energy requirements of sheep and cattle for maintenance and gain



Jour Animal Sci 18(2): 528-547



The energy requirements of sheep and cattle for maintenance and gain were investigated, 64 sheep and 39 cattle serving as the experimental animals. The response to different levels of energy intake was measured by body weight gain and by energy retention. Data were analyzed by linear and exponential regression of energy intake, expressed as (TDN) total digestible nutrient, (DE) digestible energy, and (ME) metabolizable energy, on these 2 measures of response. Net energy requirements were also determined. Energy retention was estimated by a modification of the comparative slaughter technique. This technique was simplified by making use of the known relationships which exist among the major chemical components of the animal body. The specific gravity of the dressed animal carcass was the only measure necessary from which body composition could be estimated. The relationships necessary for estimating body composition of cattle from carcass specific gravity were available in the literature. To apply this method to sheep the necessary relationships were established from data found in the literature and by the chemical analysis of 20 sheep carcasses. The following relationships were established: (1) percent carcass fat = 556.6 -505.0 x (carcass specific gravity), (2) percent whole body fat = 0.8817 x (carcass fat) - 1.520, (3) percent whole body water = 76.89 - 0.8384 x (percent whole body fat), (4) the fat-free dry matter is 80.7% organic matter (protein). All whole body values are on a wool-free empty-body basis. The estimated daily energy requirements of sheep and cattle for maintenance of energy equilibrium can be obtained in terms of the different measures of food energy by the following expressions: TDN = 0.036w3/4; DE = 76w3/4; ME = 62w3/4; NE (net energy) = 35w3/4. TDN and weight (w) are in pounds. DE, ME, and NE are in kilocalories. The partial efficiency of food utilization was independent of body size. Therefore, one relationship between energy intake and energy gain will express the energy requirements of sheep and cattle. For example, an estimate of DE for any rate of energy gain in either species can be determined from the expression: DE = 76 w3/4 (1.03)ge/w3/4 where ge is gain in kilocalories. Other less complex, easier to use relationships between energy intake and energy retention or body weight gain were established from the data. These equations enable the estimation of the energy required for any rate of energy retention or weight gain in each species. In estimating energy requirements, TDN, DE, and ME can be used as the measure of food energy with equal accuracy. This is interpreted as indicating an equality between these measures of food energy for expressing the energy value of a ration.

(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 014230554

Download citation: RISBibTeXText



Related references

Nutritional requirements of finishing beef cattle: II. Energy requirements for maintenance and weight gain. Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Zootecnia 22(1): 122-132, 1993

The energy requirements of sheep for maintenance and gain. 2. Grazing sheep. J. Agric. Sci, 58: 187, 1962

The energy requirements of sheep for maintenance and gain II Grazing sheep. The Journal of Agricultural Science 58(2): 187, 1962

The energy requirements of sheep for maintenance and gain. 1. Pen fed sheep. J. Agric. Sci, 58: 179-186, 1962

The energy requirements of sheep for maintenance and gain I Pen fed sheep. The Journal of Agricultural Science 58(2): 179, 1962

Nutritional requirements of finishing beef cattle. Energy requirement for maintenance and weight gain. Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Zootecnia 22(1): 121-132, 1993

Estimation of maintenance energy requirements of beef cattle and sheep. Journal of Agricultural Science 131(4): 477-485, 1998

The voluntary intake of food by sheep and cattle in relation to their energy requirements for maintenance. Anim Prod 8(1): 75-83, 1966

Energy requirements for maintenance and net efficiency of metabolizable energy utilization for maintenance and weight gain of Moxoto kids. Revista Brasileira De Zootecnia: 8, 1475-1482, 2008

The dietary energy requirements of dorper sheep part 1 the maintenance energy requirements of lambs and mature ewes. Rhodesian Journal of Agricultural Research 7(2): 89-96, 1969

The dietary energy requirements of Dorper sheep. 1. The maintenance energy requirements of lambs and mature ewes. Rhodesiar J. Agric. Res, 7: 89-96, 1969

Use of comparative slaughter to set maintenance energy requirements of beef cattle grazing elephantgrass: description of methodology and results. Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia 34(5): 1721-1729, 2005

Gain composition and net energy and protein requirements for weight gain in Nellore and crossbred cattle. Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia 35(3): 886-893, 2006

Nutritional requirements of beef cattle bulls in feedlot. 1. Body content and net requirements of protein and energy for liveweight gain. Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia 26(3): 575-583, May-June, 1997

The energy requirements of the Chios sheep. 1. Requirements for maintenance and late pregnancy. Technical Bulletin, Agricultural Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Cyprus (40): 12, 1981