EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

The water relations of tree seedlings. IV. Some aspects of the tissue water relations and drought resistance



The water relations of tree seedlings. IV. Some aspects of the tissue water relations and drought resistance



Physiol Plant 16(3): 501-516



The internal water balance of leaves of Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, Betula verrucosa and Populus tremula was examined to facilitate interpretation of the growth and transpiration responses to moisture stress described earlier. (1) The relation between leaf relative turgidity and water potential varied such that the leaf potential at 50% relative turgidity was -650, -530, -350 and -440 j/hg for spruce, pine, birch and aspen, respectively. Since growth reduction in response to moisture stress was most in spruce and least in birch and aspen, it is suggested that a leaf moisture characteristic such that a large decrease in water potential corresponds to a small decrease in relative turgidity is inimical to good growth at small moisture stresses because of the water potentials which develop, although it confers greater drought resistance. (2) Boundary levels of leaf water potential in j/hg and relative turgidity in percent (in brackets) for stomatal closure were -370(71), -150(82), -100(90) and -50(90) for spruce, pine, birch and aspen, respectively. A small decrease in water potential resulted in a rapid decrease in aspen transpiration. The other species, especially spruce, were less sensitive. (3) Critical levels of leaf water potential in j/hg and relative turgidity in percent (in brackets) for desiccation tolerance were: -950(40), -700(38), -500(40) and -400(54) for spruce, pine, birch and aspen, respectively. (4) Shoot drought avoidance was greatest in pine>spruce>birch>aspen. This coupled with the desiccation tolerances gave drought resistance in the same order. The rate of change in relative turgidity by cuticular water loss (in percent relative turgidity /minute) was 0.02, 0.04, 0.20 and 0.49 for spruce, pine, birch and aspen, respectively. Aspen loses water rapidly through the cuticle and has very low drought avoidance and tolerance. (5) The results are discussed in relation to the previously published growth and transpiration responses.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 014279238

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-3054.1963.tb08327.x



Related references

Tissue water relations of quercus wislizenii seedlings drought resistance in a california evergreen oak. Acta Oecologica 13(1): 127-136, 1992

Tissue water relations and survival of conditioned conifer seedlings during drought stress. Proceedings, 10th North American Forest Biology Workshop, ' Physiology and genetics of reforestation' , Vancouver, British Columbia, July 10-22, 1988: 177-185, 1988

Relations between changes of ascorbic acid level and the drought resistance of maize seedlings under water stress. Crop Genetic Resources ( 3): 9-11, 1993

Genetic aspects of water relations and drought resistance in crops. Biochemical aspects of crop improvement: 153-175, 1991

Elevated CO2 and drought alter tissue water relations of birch (Betula populifolia Marsh.) seedlings. Oecologia 95(4): 599-602, 1993

Drought resistance of 2-year-old saplings of Mediterranean forest trees in the field: Relations between water relations, hydraulics and productivity. Plant & Soil 250(2): 259-272, March, 2003

The water relations of tree seedlings I Growth and water use in relation to soil water potential. Physiol Plantarum: 215-235, 1963

Growth and water relations of four deciduous tree species LIEBL, Q pubescens WILLD, Sorbus aria CR occurring at Central-European tree-line sites on shallow calcareous soils Physiological reactions of seedlings to severe drought. Flora (Jena) 195(2): 104-115, April, 2000

Studies on the shade tolerance, light requirement, and water relations of economic tree species(III): Analysis of pressure-volume curves on the changes of tissue water relations of five deciduous hardwood species subjected to artificial shading treatments. Journal of Korean Forestry Society 90(4): 524-534, 2001

Leaf gas exchange and water relations of lupines and wheat ii. root and shoot water relations of lupine during drought induced stomatal closure. Australian Journal of Plant Physiology 16(5): 415-428, 1989

The water relations of tree seedlings II Transpiration in relation to soil water potential. Physiologia Plantarum 16(1): 236-253, 1963

Leaf water relations, soil-to-leaf resistance, and drought stress in pecan seedlings. Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science 113(5): 789-793, 1988

Growth and water relations of four deciduous tree species (Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea Liebl., Q. pubescens Willd., Sorbus aria Cr.) occurring at Central-European tree-line sites on shallow calcareous soils: physiological reactions of seedlings to severe drought. Flora Jena 195(2): 104-115, 2000