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Portosystemic shunts in dogs and cats: definition, epidemiology and clinical signs of congenital portosystemic shunts



Portosystemic shunts in dogs and cats: definition, epidemiology and clinical signs of congenital portosystemic shunts



Vlaams Diergeneeskundig Tijdschrift 76(4): 234-240



Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) are hepatic vascular anomalies which can affect any breed of dog or cat. Extrahepatic CPSS are most commonly observed in cats and small dogs, whereas intrahepatic CPSS are more likely to affect large breed dogs. A hereditary basis has been observed in some dog breeds. Affected animals are usually presented at young age with a variety of neurological, gastrointestinal, urinary or other signs. Signs of hepatic encephalopathy often predominate.

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