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Topology of eukaryotic type II membrane proteins: importance of N-terminal positively charged residues flanking the hydrophobic domain



Topology of eukaryotic type II membrane proteins: importance of N-terminal positively charged residues flanking the hydrophobic domain



Cell 64(4): 777-787



We have tested the role of different charged residues flanking the sides of the signal/anchor (S/A) domain of a eukaryotic type II (N(cyt)C(exo)) integral membrane protein in determining its topology. The removal of positively charged residues on the N-terminal side of the S/A yields proteins with an inverted topology, while the addition of positively charged residues to only the C-terminal side has very little effect on orientation. Expression of chimeric proteins composed of domains from a type II protein (HN) and the oppositely oriented membrane protein M2 indicates that the HN N-terminal domain is sufficient to confer a type II topology and that the M2 N-terminal ectodomain can direct a type II topology when modified by adding positively charged residues. These data suggest that eukaryotic membrane protein topology is governed by the presence or absence of an N-terminal signal for retention in the cytoplasm that is composed in part of positive charges.

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Accession: 018187275

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PMID: 1997206

DOI: 10.1016/0092-8674(91)90507-u


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