+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Storage of strain-specific rat blood limits cerebral tissue oxygen delivery during acute fluid resuscitation



Storage of strain-specific rat blood limits cerebral tissue oxygen delivery during acute fluid resuscitation



British Journal of Anaesthesia 100(3): 357-364



The effect of blood storage on tissue oxygen delivery has not been clearly defined. Some studies demonstrate reduced microvascular oxygen delivery, whereas others do not. We hypothesize that storage of rat blood will limit its ability to deliver oxygen to cerebral tissue. Anaesthetized rats underwent haemorrhage (18 ml kg(-1)) and resuscitation with an equivalent amount of fresh or 7 day stored strain-specific whole blood. Arterial blood gases, co-oximetry, red cell counts and indices, and blood smears were performed. Hippocampal tissue oxygen tension (PBr(O2)), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured before and for 60 min after resuscitation (n=6). Data [mean (SD)] were analysed by anova. After 7 days, there was a significant reduction in pH, Pa(O2), an increase in Pa(CO2), but no detectable plasma haemoglobin in stored rat blood. Stored red blood cell morphology demonstrated marked echinocytosis, but no haemolysis in vitro. MAP and PBr(O2) in both groups decreased after haemorrhage. Resuscitation with stored blood returned MAP [92 (SD 16) mm Hg] and PBr(O2) [3.2 (0.7) kPa] to baseline, whereas rCBF remained stable [1.2 (0.1)]. Resuscitation with fresh blood returned MAP to baseline [105 (16) mm Hg] whereas both PBr(O2) [5.6 (1.5) kPa] and rCBF [1.9 (0.4)] increased significantly (P<0.05 for both, relative to baseline and stored blood group). There was no evidence of haemolysis in vivo. Although resuscitation with stored blood restored cerebral oxygen delivery to baseline, fresh blood produced a greater increase in both PBr(O2) and rCBF. These data support the hypothesis that storage limits the ability of RBC to deliver oxygen to brain tissue.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 021802366

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 18234679

DOI: 10.1093/bja/aem401


Related references

Hypertonic fluid resuscitation improves cerebral oxygen delivery and reduces intracranial pressure after hemorrhagic shock. Journal of Trauma 31(12): 1607-1613, 1991

Restitution of cerebral oxygen delivery by a small volume of perfluorooctylbromide after fluid resuscitation from hemorrhage in conscious rats. Anesthesiology 81(3A): A722, 1994

The effect of inspired oxygen concentration on cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption following global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion from cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts 23(1-2): 1378, 1997

Intravenous fluid tonicity: effect on intracranial pressure, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral oxygen delivery in focal brain injury. Journal of Neurosurgery 76(1): 91-98, 1992

Blood Flow Versus Hematocrit in Optimization of Oxygen Transfer to Tissue During Fluid Resuscitation. Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology 6(4): 474-484, 2015

Cerebral blood flow cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen and cerebro spinal fluid acid base parameters in patients with acute pyogenic meningitis and with acute encephalitis. Stroke 4(3): 353-354, 1973

Regional cerebral blood flow cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen and cerebro spinal fluid acid base variables in patients with acute meningitis and with acute encephalitis. Acta Medica Scandinavica 196(3): 191-198, 1974

Experimental studes on hypothermia from a neurosurgical point of view. II. On cerebral tissue oxygen consumption, cerebral blood saturation and pH changes in brain tissue and cerebral blood, with special reference to the cessation of blood flow. Sapporo Med Jour 19(1): 48-63, 1961

The relationship between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption during fluid resuscitation of burn-related shock. Journal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation 21(2): 147-154, 2001

Cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen metabolism, cerebral glucose metabolism, and tissue pH in human acute cerebral infarction using positron emission tomography. No to Shinkei 37(1): 56-64, 1985

Studies of cerebral blood flow cerebral oxygen metabolism cerebral glucose metabolism and tissue ph in human acute cerebral infarction using positron emission tomography. Brain & Nerve 37(1): 56-64, 1985

Autoradiographic determination of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism in conscious rats after fluid resuscitation from haemorrhage with a haemoglobin-based oxygen carrier. British Journal of Anaesthesia 73(4): 522-528, 1994

The relationship between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption during fluid resuscitation of burn-related shock From the authors. Journal of Burn Care & Rehabilitation 21(4): 392-393, July-August, 2000

Comparison of induced hypertension, fluid bolus, and blood transfusion to augment cerebral oxygen delivery after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Journal of Neurosurgery 116(3): 648-656, 2012

Oxygen delivery and oxygen tension in cerebral tissue during global cerebral ischaemia: a swine model. Acta Neurochirurgica. Supplement 76: 199-202, 2000