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Meadow mouse girdling another cause of death of reseeded bitterbrush plants



Meadow mouse girdling another cause of death of reseeded bitterbrush plants



Ecology 42(1): 198



During 1957 and 1958, a population irruption of the meadow mouse (Microtus montanus) occurred in northeastern California and Oregon. The mice moved into an area reseeded to bitterbrush killing about 5% of the young plants and damaging another 15%. Great Basin wild rye (Elymus cinereus) plants furnished the principal cover and food for the mice.

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Accession: 023011766

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